Arts, Culture & Media

Arden Reed on ‘slow art’

SlowArt.jpg

Visitors walk near Edward Hopper's (1882-1967) oil painting "Nighthawks."

Credit:

John Schults / Reuters

When we look at a painting, or a photograph, or an art installation in a museum, we spend just seconds looking at it. Is that enough time to really get it?

Player utilities

This story is based on a radio interview. Listen to the full interview.

Professor Arden Reed doesn’t think so. He has taken a long, slow look at visual art and how we experience it in his new book, “Slow Art.”

Reed explains his approach, drawing examples from painting, music and installation art. It turns out “slow art” can even be found in unexpected places — like pop songs by Justin Bieber!

Edward Hopper, “Nighthawks” (1942)

Edward Hopper, “Nighthawks” (1942)

Nighthawks painting at The Art Institute of Chicago.

Credit:

Edward Hopper / Wikimedia

James Turrell “The Kielder Skyspace” (2000)

James Turrell “The Kielder Skyspace” (2000)

Skyspace Skyspace in Kielder Forest.

Credit:

Peter McDermot / Wikimedia