The World from PRX — A daily world news program
Featured stories
Listen: The World's Latest Edition podcast

The United States is no stranger to police brutality and violence. But with the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, has the world's attention changed the equation? And, from Iran to China to Russia, America's adversaries are using the protests as anti-US propaganda fodder. Also, hundreds of LGBTQ Pride events have been canceled due to COVID-19 restrictions. Still, many people around the world are finding new ways to celebrate.

Environment
Gender

The path to victory in the US presidential election in November cannot afford to ignore the Latino vote. But Latinas' voting power goes beyond their individual votes: They’re likely to encourage friends and family to vote, too.

New Zealand is “halfway down Everest,” Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said of the country’s battle with the coronavirus. New Zealand, Taiwan, Denmark, Finland, Iceland and Norway all have notably low rates of fatalities and Germany stands out in central Europe for its low death rate. The seven countries have something else in common: All are led by women. Is it a coincidence or are women leaders better at managing the coronavirus?

Immigration

More than a month after the coronavirus pandemic shut down US universities, international students continue to face uncertainty over what the coming school year will look like — some aren't sure if they would be able to come back to campus. What kind of financial hit could US universities expect if there's a drop in enrollment among international students?

Conflict & Justice

The US spends billions and billions of dollars on defense, but the novel coronavirus slipped silently and invisibly across US borders and even onto military aircraft carriers. One could say the US was preparing for World War III when it got hammered by World War C — the coronavirus. 

Thought Brexit was over, right? Wrong. Britain did leave the EU at the end of January, but in reality, nothing much has changed. The real deadline is Dec. 31, and negotiations are set to take place until then. There’s just one problem: a pandemic.