Patrick Cox

Patrick Cox

Language Editor

At The World, I switch between editing and reporting, broadcasting and podcasting, in-depth series and tweeting.  Words connect what I do. On a good day they are intelligible.

Since 2008, I have been running The World's language desk and hosting a podcast called The World in Words. Before that, I reported on politics and culture, contributing to series on global obesity, the mental scars of Hiroshima and others.

London is my home town, Cambridge, MA, my adopted hometown. I have also lived in Alaska, California, Denmark and Moldova. 

Because of my job, I am sometimes mistakenly taken to be some kind of linguistic expert— by people who have not been exposed to my spelling or grammar. Despite that, I speak reasonable Danish, poor Chinese and atrocious French. I can read menus and follow soccer commentary in a few other languages.

Follow Patrick Cox on Twitter.

The World in Words podcast is on Facebook and iTunes

Recent Stories

Culture

Talking Texas in Iran

What is it about Texas that sparks the global imagination? Persian and Turkish both have an expression that means, "This is not Texas." The Norwegian adjective, 'Texas' means out of control.

Belief

When in Rome...

Pope Francis has switched the official language of Vatican doctrine from Latin to Italian. He's also democratized his meetings with bishops. So why do some conservative bishops believe that contentious reforms are being deliberately lost in translation?

Justice

Matahara: When pregnant women, new moms are harassed at work

A lawsuit has drawn the Japanese public's attention to "matahara": a word coined from the English "maternity harassment." It refers to the practice of demoting or even laying off women when they become pregnant. It's against the law in Japan, but still widespread. Advocates hope giving it a name will start to change that.

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