The Nathaniel B. Palmer is seen on the water with this ship's red bottom and cream colored top.
The researchers aboard the Nathaniel B. Palmer are excited to return home after spending weeks studying Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica. While the comfort of their own beds await, there’s also the important work of writing up their research findings.
kids climate march
Thousands of students in Europe and elsewhere have been skipping school on Fridays to demand their governments take stronger action against climate change. Some teachers and politicians are pushing back, but the students are getting support from their elders as well.
Grease ice dampens ripples in the water near a golden orange sunset.
The research team aboard the Nathaniel B. Palmer is starting to wrap up their work studying Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica. As the Amundsen Sea starts to freeze up, the captain of the ship will be constantly on the lookout for gaps in the ice that will carry the ship home.
Researchers hoist the orange-colored Hugin autonomous submarine onto the deck of the Nathaniel B. Palmer.
The World's Carolyn Beeler has her latest dispatch from a research trip to Antarctica. Climate change researchers aboard the icebreaker Nathaniel B. Palmer sent a robotic submarine for the first look ever at the seafloor under the massive Thwaites Glacier.
The eastern ice tongue of Thwaites Glacier is shown rising out of deep blue ocean waters.
The Nathaniel B. Palmer arrived at Thwaites Glacier on Feb. 26, roughly a month after leaving Punta Arenas, Chile. During its first day in front of the glacier, the Palmer traced a roughly 100-mile path around the edge of Thwaites mapping portions of the sea floor that were previously uncharted.
ship
A medical emergency aboard the Nathaniel B. Palmer sends the ship and reporter Carolyn Beeler back north just as they’re about to reach the Thwaites Glacier.
seals
​​​​​​​How quickly will Antarctica’s massive Thwaites Glacier melt, and what will that mean for global sea levels and coastal cities? Researchers are sailing toward Thwaites this month on the first leg of a five-year, international effort to try to answer that pressing question, and along the way they’re enlisting local seals as research assistants.
Researchers aboard the Nathanial B. Palmer gather on the ship’s bridge to view one of the first icebergs they encountered.
The World’s Carolyn Beeler is on a ship bound for Antarctica on an expedition looking into the fate of one of the frozen continent's biggest glaciers. What they learn could tell us a lot about how quickly sea levels around the world will rise.
Three crew members are shown in a room with a green floor all leaning in order to stay balanced.
The World's Carolyn Beeler crossed the passage armed with tips on how to prevent seasickness — and about a pound of ginger — and sent back her second dispatch from the trip.
Nathaniel B Palmer in port
The World’s Carolyn Beeler's first dispatch from onboard the icebreaker comes from the port of Punta Arenas, in Chile’s Tierra del Fuego.

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