A black and white photo of people going through immigration queues
The "likely to become a public charge" clause originally targeted southern and eastern European immigrants. It has since become a tool to exclude "undesirable" immigrants du jour.
Tennessee State University campus
Historically black universities are bringing in foreign students to give their campuses more international flavor, and help with the bottom line.
A close up of a hand and a USCIS folder
Two California counties are suing the Trump Administration to block a new rule that would make it harder for immigrants to gain permanent residency in the US. But the "public charge" rule isn't anything new.
A group of people is seen on a mobile staircase at an airport.
The Phillips Collection's new exhibition, “The Warmth of Other Suns: Stories of Global Displacement,” takes a look at immigration and the struggles of those who have been displaced.
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The World’s Monica Campbell shares stories of migrants waiting in Tijuana, Mexico, to enter the US.
A hand waving a small American flag
The Trump administration issued a "public charge" rule designed to restrict residency for immigrants with the potential to receive public assistance.
A close-up of a woman speaking
Mexican federal authorities have announced their government is contemplating extraditing the El Paso shooter suspect on terrorism charges. Ambassador Martha Bárcena speaks to The World's Marco Werman.
A woman holds open a magazine with an illustration of an astronaut and cat on the cover. The woman's eyes are visible above the pages.
With a trailblazing zine centered around a rebel “saint,” Isabel Castro and Natasha Hernandez create a space for Latinx individuals looking for gender-challenging, border-crossing and ass-kicking representation.
Employment authorization forms
Across the country, international students are facing difficulties in obtaining a work permit that allow them to get training in their field of study. College administrators and immigration experts say visa delays and denials can have repercussions for American higher education and critical industries such as the health field.
Men in uniform open the door to a house.
Today, a new Trump administration policy will go into effect that will allow the government to deport undocumented immigrants without a court hearing if they are unable to demonstrate they’ve been in the country for at least two years. Marco Werman spoke with law professor César García Hernández to explain what this could mean for immigrants and deportations across the United States.

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