surveillance

Justice

Why British intelligence wants your Facebook data

Facebook said this week that governments are upping their demands for user data, renewing the focus on Internet privacy. But in the UK, the intelligence community's position is clear: The Internet is a breeding ground of crime and terror, and privacy should take a backseat.

Books

What happens in Vegas, stays in a Vegas casino's database

We all know the saying about Vegas, but be aware that all of things that stay in Vegas still end up in the huge data repositories of casinos. Adam Tanner's new book tracks how they're vacuuming up every bit of information they can on their customers to keep people coming back.

Justice

Here's what happens when a spy sleeps with his targets

This is the story of Bob and Jacqui — Bob Lambert was a British police spy who worked in counterterrorism and Jacqui fell in love with the man she thought was a Greenpeace activist. Now, decades later, their relationship is at the center of a lawsuit over "rape by the state."

Environment

In Toronto, the WiFi may come with a side of electronic snooping

So a guy walks into a Toronto bar ... wait, you've heard this one already? Some 170 WiFi-based sensors have recently been installed in Toronto bars, cafes and restaurants to track customers' activity. The sensors can detect location data from smartphones and provides business owners with a profile of their customers.

Pages

Global Scan

When does extinct not really mean extinct?

The Tasmanian tiger was believed to have gone extinct in the wild back in the 1930s, but it may have been more resilient than we thought. An expedition says its found evidence that the creatures still exist. Plus the Philippines try to pick up the pieces after Typhoon Haiyan devastates the area. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Censorship? It's as bad as ever in Egypt

When the revolution deposed President Hosni Mubarak, Egyptians thought they had gotten rid of censorship, too. But today's cartoon mocks the continuing censorship by the new military government. Also, why are Spaniards the most common cocaine users in Europe. And a Cold War-style confrontation is brewing between the US and China in the Pacific. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

What's the next best thing to a roll in the mud with pigs?

Chinese pigs need a genetic upgrade, so Britain has graciously offered to help China at a $74 million per year price tag. China may not have bragged about its pigs, but an international test showed Chinese kids at the top of the class. But there's a catch. And Iceland grieves after the the police kill a man, for the first time in the country's history. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.