surveillance

Justice

Mexican officials turned spyware on international investigators

Adding to a snowballing scandal over government spying on journalists, activists and other public figures in Mexico, computer security experts confirmed that an independent investigation into the disappearance and alleged massacre of 43 students in 2014 was targeted with highly invasive spyware known as Pegasus.

Conflict

How the Kouachi brothers fell through the cracks

Both French and American authorities are facing serious questions over the failure to prevent this week's Paris siege. The answers may be matters of intelligence and diplomacy — but they could also come down to simple matters of time and money.

Technology

The year of surveillance is finally over

Surveillance was all over the news in 2014, and we learned plenty of new ways governments and companies have found to track everyday users. Here's a list of eight ways we found out our privacy was under attack this year.

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Global Scan

What would global cartoonists do without US spying revelations?

Continuing revelations from Edward Snowden are feeding the political humor mill around the world, as they also feed anger among US allies. In today's Global Scan, we find at least one leader who doesn't have to worry about US electronic eavesdropping. And we find new uses for ktichenware, from spamming to political protest.

Global Scan

A defiant Morsi adds chaos to the start of his trial in Egypt

Ousted leader Mohammed Morsi proclaims his legitimacy in an Egyptian court, and we have the NSA's top ten list of why its widespread spying is legitimate. Also, a $1.3 billion treasure trove of artwork stolen by the Nazis is found in a hoarder's Munich apartment. That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

These days, anybody can be a politician

Rob Ford remains steadfast in his refusal to give up his job as mayor of Toronto — and perhaps that's providing motivation to some of Canada's other drug users. Edward Snowden's revelations have sparked hearings before the British Parliament and Twitter had finally gone public. Those stories and others in today's Global Scan.