infrastructure

Economics

How to bring high-speed trains to the US

Japan's high speed trains run upwards of 200 miles per hour while Amtrak's Acela can only go its top speed of 150 for short stretches. The reason? Outdated infrastructure. After World War II, the US invested in cars, not trains, and today its passenger railways lag far behind countries in Europe and Asia. Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter lays out a new vision for US transportation in her book "Move: Putting America's Infrastructure Back in the Lead."

Health & Medicine

Part I: Rethinking the Model Family

In Ethiopia, having eight children is not uncommon. To reduce birth rates, the government has enlisted the help of health workers and religious leaders. Their goal: change attitudes about what constitutes an "ideal" family.

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Conflict & Justice

Hundreds missing after New Zealand quake

About 300 people remain missing in New Zealand in the aftermath of Tuesday's earthquake. 75 people are known dead, with the toll expected to rise. Anchor Lisa Mullins speaks with Ian Maclean of the NZ Ministry of Civil Defense and Emergency Management.

Conflict & Justice

Possible scenarios for Libya

The World's Katy Clark reports on what could happen in Libya if the Gaddafi regime were to fall. There's concern that chaos or civil war could follow, because Gaddafi has prevented any leaders or institutions to develop under his rule.

Conflict & Justice

Tunisia's growing refugee crisis

Tens of thousands of people in Libya have been fleeing to Tunisia to escape the fighting. Anchor Lisa Mullins speaks with Firas Kayal, a representative of the UNHCR refugee agency, who is on the border between Tunisia and Libya.

Global Politics

Ethiopia runs out of Coca-Cola

One impact of the global economic crisis in Ethiopia is a shortage of Coca Cola. Though it may not seem like a serious concern, the BBC's Elizabeth Blunt tells anchor Katy Clark why the Ethiopian government is treating it as a national emergency.

Global Politics

Clearing the air in China

The World's Mary Kay Magistad reports on China's efforts to reduce air pollution. Officials in the southern regions of Guandong say they're taking tough measure to cut back on emissions. But the air doesn't seem to be getting cleaner.

Health & Medicine

Tehran's air pollution woes

In Tehran, more and more Iranians are buying more and more cars... with predictable results -- congestion and smog. Correspondent Steve Zind reports that air pollution in the Iranian capital is causing health problems for citizens and headaches for city officials.