Economics

Putting an end to 'chain migration' could have a negative economic impact

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A U.S. flag and patriotic bunting is displayed on a beachside motel in New Jersey.

A US flag and patriotic bunting is displayed on a beachside motel in New Jersey. 

Credit:

Mark Makela/Reuters

Akayed Ullah, 27, is accused of setting off a pipe bomb in New York City on Monday, injuring five people, including himself.

He came to the US from Bangladesh in 2011 on a visa for relatives of a US citizen.

Related: Investigators search for clues in attempted New York subway bombing

In response to the attack, President Donald Trump has reiterated his call to end “chain migration.”

About two-thirds of the 1 million people granted permanent residence in the US each year come from all over the world based on family connections. But there might be a negative impact of halting family-based migration. 

“If you get rid of chain migration or limit it severely, you're not just impacting the lives of immigrants, you're actually impacting the US economy at large,” says Pawan Dhingra, sociology professor at Tufts University.

The motel industry is one example. Indian immigrants own half of the motels across America, despite making up just a small percentage of the population.

Dhingra says that immigrants can bring their extended family to the US to help get small businesses off the ground, providing them with jobs while saving on labor expenses.

You can hear more about the economic impact of “chain migration” above.

In Business, Economics and JobsEconomicsJobsPoliticsGlobal Politics.

Tagged: United StatesDonald Trump.