Bahraini Shiite Muslim protesters wave their national flag during a demonstration in solidarity with political prisoners and against the government in the village of Malikiya, south of Manama, on December 4, 2012.
Credit: Mohammed Al-Shaikh

Little change in Bahrain despite two years of protests and strikes that have left at least 70 people dead.

An anti-government rally in Bahrain on Dec. 7, 2012.
Credit: Mohammed Al-Shaikh
A man cycles past a burning dumpster during an anti-government demonstration in Bahrain on Dec. 4, 2012. Bahrain's Court of Cassation has set a Jan. 7 date to announce its verdict in the trial of 13 opposition leaders jailed for their role in last year's unrest.
Credit: Mohammed Al-Shaikh
Boys join others trying to block a road during an anti-government demonstration in Bahrain on Dec. 4, 2012.
Credit: Mohammed Al-Shaikh
A woman looks out for riot police during clashes following an anti-government demonstration in Bahrain on Dec. 3, 2012.
Credit: Mohammed Al-Shaikh
Walls are covered with leaflets showing the faces of "martyrs" killed by government forces. So far at least 70 people have died in the violence.
Credit: Reese Erlich
The image of a protester from Muhazza Village killed by police.
Credit: Reese Erlich
Women protesters in Bahrain flash the sign for victory near a cloud of tear gas fired by riot police in the village of Abu Saiba, west of Manama, on Dec. 3, 2012.
Credit: Mohammed Al-Shaikh
A protester in Bahrain flashes the sign for victory during clashes with riot police in the village of Karranah, west of Manama, on Nov. 30, 2012.
Credit: Mohammed Al-Shaikh
Children from Muhazza Village flash the "V" sign while sitting on a residents-constructed road block.
Credit: Reese Erlich
Old and young gather for a illegal night time rally. Police later attacked with tear gas. The slow pace of Bahrain's reform movement has led some young protesters to embrace violence as a tactic.
Credit: Reese Erlich
Old and young gather for a illegal night time rally. Police later attacked with tear gas. The slow pace of Bahrain's reform movement has led some young protesters to embrace violence as a tactic.
Credit: Reese Erlich
Abdullah al Mizo shows where security forces smashed a window inside his apartment.
Credit: Reese Erlich
Tawaa Al-Wadi is a former secretary. She was fired after participating in a general strike last year, but has been unable to return to work. The issue of fired workers has divided Bahrain's labor movement and has promoted calls from US labor organizations for an end to the US Free Trade Agreement with Bahrain.
Credit: Reese Erlich

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