After four decades of  tyrannical  rule, and a bloody seven month uprising with the assistance of the international community, a new chapter begins in Libya today.  NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen announced the end of the alliance's seven month mission in Libya on Monday. Shortly thereafter, Libya's National Transitional Council elected a new interim prime minister. That's NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen yeseterday, announcing the end of the alliance's seven month mission in Libya. The mission saw NATO provide assistance to the rebel uprising that eventually led to the overthrow and killing of dictator Moammar Gadhafi. The destruction yesterday of the deposed Libyan leader's Tripoli home provided a fitting backdrop to the end of the military. Gadhafi was captured and killed in his hometown of Sirte less than two weeks ago, officially bringing an end to his brutal 42 year rule of the country. But what will his ultimate legacy on the country be? And what's next for Libya? Joining us now to answer those questions is Jon Lee Anderson. He's a staff writer at The New Yorker and he's got an article in this week's edition of the magazine "King of Kings: The Last Days Of Muammar Qaddafi". Jon Lee Anderson,  staff writer for  The New Yorker, talks about his new article,  "King of Kings: The Last Days Of Muammar Qaddafi," and what Libya's future will be without the dictator.