(MN's uncle has been held for almost two months and MN and his family have used the video link twice to speak with him): When we went to the Red cross office, my uncle was on the TV. We were happy when we saw him. (Were you told what you could and could not say to him?) It was written that we should not ask about the background and don't ask if there's any torture. (Was the Red Cross or the military saying this?) I don't have that information. (When you spoke to him through the video, did you get the impression that he was ok or not?) It's prison, it's impossible to be happy, but he was not unhappy. (Now talking to GP. How do people like MN even find out they have a relative inside Bagram Prison?) One of the services we offer and we negotiate with the authorities to be able to carry out is the reestablishment of family links. (Why did the Red Cross take the initiative on this?) The initiative was offered by the US military authorities at Bagram in a discussion about reviving freedoms to contact family members. (What was it like when you saw your first video conference?) It was a touching moment. Some of them are coming from remote areas and technology is new to them. (One would think this is fairly risky for the military, but have you discussed the risks with the military about what an inmate might say?) I didn't hear of any such problem. When the family comes, they come with babies and old men and women and they become reunited.

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