Full story - August 09, 2019
A group of tourists stands taking selfies outside.
Tourism is a multi-trillion dollar industry, but how did it start? A history professor breaks down the origins of modern tourism and explains the impact it has had on our world today — good and bad.
Full story - August 02, 2019
A roulette wheel is spun.
An economist and journalist attempts to understand how risk management looks in the workplace outside the world of finance.
Full story - July 19, 2019
A mushroom cloud from a nuclear bomb.
The begging of the nuclear age at the end of World War II happened, in large part, due to fears that Germany would detonate an atomic bomb first. See how the United States pushed itself to become the world's first nuclear power.
Full story - July 12, 2019
Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, and Kamala Harris at a Democratic primary debate.
Not everyone’s a winner when tech jobs come to town. Find out how the wage gap between Americans has grown — and what that means for people of color.
Full story - June 21, 2019
Four elderly people sit on a park bench.
Science has made recent breakthroughs in their understanding of age. Find out what scientists are saying does — and doesn't —  allow us to age slower.
Full story - June 17, 2019
A cat stands next to someone writing.
While specialists have accomplished great things, author David Epstein makes the argument for why generalists may be better suited to the modern world.
Full story - June 07, 2019
a teacher reads a book to a group of student.
You've heard of his books — now hear the story of the man behind them: Dr. Seuss. Find out what influenced the books that have captivated children for decades.
Full story - June 03, 2019
Donald Trump and Hilary Clinton shake hands on stage in front of a crowd.
The polarization between Republicans and Democrats in the United States has grown in recent years — especially since the election of Donald Trump. Analysis suggests that this trend may be here to stay.
Full story - May 29, 2019
A marble statue stands in front of a Greek flag.
Researchers at MIT’s Collective Learning Group have investigated big questions behind fame. From new material to changing ethics, a variety of factors may impact what we ultimately remember as a society.
Full story - May 21, 2019
a white bottle of Oxycontin sits on a shelf.
With overdoses becoming an increasing problem in the US, its more important than ever to understand how our brains react to drugs. Judith Grisel, a former drug addict turned neuroscientist, explains how our brains become addicted to drugs and shares her story.

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