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June 05, 2018

Latest Stories

Technology

How police license plate readers can invade your privacy

License plate readers scan plate numbers and then cross-reference them with a “hot list” of plates of wanted or stolen vehicles. The problem is that only a small fraction of the plates are on the wanted list; the rest belong to non-criminal, law-abiding people – people whose movements the government could now conceivably track.

Conflict

Living under ISIS rule — and then escaping it

Mezar Matar’s witnessed ISIS fighters take over his hometown in the summer of 2013. He saw them violently enforce Sharia law, seize homes, close schools and stage elaborate public executions. He watched as they punished women for their clothes, flogged anyone on the streets during prayer times and beat people for smoking cigarettes. Matar saw ISIS arrest his friends, abduct his brother and recruit children to join its ranks.

Global Politics

Kenya basically bans all drone use — despite potential benefits they may yield

There is vast potential for drone use in the developing world. In recent years, an explosion of initiatives has popped up across the continent of Africa, from unmanned peacekeeping missions in the Democratic Republic of the Congo to Facebook’s high-hovering drones that bring the Internet to remote places. But the technology has proliferated faster than regulations can keep up. A couple countries have banned them altogether, including Kenya. Recent terrorist attacks have much to do with the restrictions there, but innovators think the country has more to gain from drones than it has to lose.

Conflict

North Korea puts its DMZ-crossing drone fleet on display

During a recent military celebration in the North Korean capital Pyongyang, goose-stepping soldiers, tanks, and allegedly nuclear-tipped missiles were paraded past the cheering throngs. Also on display? The reclusive nation’s fleet of military drones. And some of those drones have already crossed the border, posing a threat to both South Korea and the United States, which has 28,000 soldiers stationed near the demilitarized zone.

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