Latest Podcasts from afropop.org

In Jamaica, sound systems are more than just a stack of speakers blasting the latest tunes to an eager crowd. Over the last 70 years, they have come to represent the most common way that Jamaicans experience music. Sound systems have touched all levels of society in Jamaica, determining the island’...
France has a pretty unique relationship to its former colonies, sharing a strong common history and a common language, but also painful episodes not really taught at school—neither in France nor in Africa. In France and in French-speaking African countries today, there is a new generation of...
As Afropop Worldwide marks the week of its 30th anniversary on the public airwaves, we take a look at the story that led up to the program’s creation. We hear excerpts from the podcast A Show of Hearts profiling the program’s founders Sean Barlow and Banning Eyre. And host Georges Collinet recalls...
The clave cuts the air, the drums triangulate in endless conversation, the singers push their voices over the rhythm, competing with daring improvisations, while a pair of dancers tease and provoke, shifting across the small space between singers and drummers: This is an Afro-Cuban rumba, a...
At the 2019 Atlantic Music Expo in Cape Verde, Afropop's Sebastian Bouknight met Manolo, a longtime rapper who is trying to find a foothold in the country's overcrowded music scene.
Full story - February 06, 2015
A portrait of Bob Marley hangs in a market in Los Angeles
Bob Marley, whose museum President Barack Obama visited in Jamaica on Thursday, may have been the biggest "Third World Superstar" — and his influence extended to musicians worldwide.
Full story - January 02, 2015
South African artist Spoek Mathambo performs in 2011.
It was a great year for African pop music and its growing crossover influence, but some of the most important and interesting releases of the year weren't on albums. They were part of the online mixes that are now a vital part of discovering and enjoying new music.
Modern salegy artist Aly Mourad performs at Jao's Pub in Antananarivo, Madagascar. Mourad blends traditional salegy with a more upbeat style.
In the days after World War II, musicians in the northern villages of the huge island nation of Madagascar started fusing traditional folk songs with modern styles. The result was a style called salegy, and it's still everywhere in Madagascar, now evolving for yet another new age.

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