Latest Podcasts from afropop.org

APWW #794 We’re hopeless at making Top-10 lists--or even top-40s—so you’ll have to settle for this: a whole hour of some of our favorite tunes of 2018. Casting the net deep and wide, Banning and Georges spin new records by our old favorites, the freshest cuts from new artists and reissues that...
We just wrapped up our third season of our podcast series Afropop Closeups, and it may have been the best season yet. Afropop producers traveled from watching reggae artists in chilly Berlin to Thomas Mapfumo’s triumphant return concert in Harare, Zimbabwe. They witnessed how digital technology...
Flamenco as we know it was “born” in Spain in the mid-19th century. But for centuries before that, Roma (Gitanos, Gypsies) had been living in Spanish cities, often rubbing shoulders with the descendants of Africans (Moors), who had been there as both citizens and slaves going back to Medieval times...
712 Sounds Like Brooklyn At Afropop, we have gone far and wide, from Brazil to England to Madagascar to Egypt, tracking down incredible music to bring back home to our headquarters in Brooklyn. For this program, "Sounds Like Brooklyn," we stay closer to home, tracing a hidden music economy of CD...
New Orleans, Louisiana is home to some of America's greatest musical traditions, and plays an outsized influence on the evolution of everything from jazz through to r&b, rock and funk. Today, the city is still legendary for its second line brass bands and brightly costumed Mardi Gras Indians....
Full story - February 06, 2015
A portrait of Bob Marley hangs in a market in Los Angeles
Bob Marley, whose museum President Barack Obama visited in Jamaica on Thursday, may have been the biggest "Third World Superstar" — and his influence extended to musicians worldwide.
Full story - January 02, 2015
South African artist Spoek Mathambo performs in 2011.
It was a great year for African pop music and its growing crossover influence, but some of the most important and interesting releases of the year weren't on albums. They were part of the online mixes that are now a vital part of discovering and enjoying new music.
Modern salegy artist Aly Mourad performs at Jao's Pub in Antananarivo, Madagascar. Mourad blends traditional salegy with a more upbeat style.
In the days after World War II, musicians in the northern villages of the huge island nation of Madagascar started fusing traditional folk songs with modern styles. The result was a style called salegy, and it's still everywhere in Madagascar, now evolving for yet another new age.

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