Doomsday 2012: China prepares with apocalypse pods

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The airtight spheres with varying interiors contain oxygen tanks and seatbelts with space for around 14 people, and are designed to remain upright when in water.

Credit:

Ed Jones

Police have arrested almost 1,000 doomsday cult members in China for spreading rumors about the end of the world.

According to BBC News, members of the sect, named Almighty God, have predicted that come Friday, Dec. 21, the world will be engulfed in three days of darkness. It urges its members to overthrow communism during this time.

GlobalPost's correspondent in Taiwan reported that the Hollywood movie “2012,” which starred John Cusak and depicted the Mayan apocalypse, was a box-office smash in China. In "2012," humanity is given another shot at survival when the Chinese government comes through by building massive arks.

While most are certain that the government will protect them if the end of the world is really coming, others have decided to fend for themselves; a farmer in Hebei province built seven 14-person pods in his garage, which he’s hoping to sell for about $50,000 each.

If you can't shell out the cash for his pods, though, GlobalPost has a guide to finding a more economical fallout shelter. Or even an ark.  

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    The airtight spheres with varying interiors contain oxygen tanks and seatbelts with space for around 14 people, and are designed to remain upright when in water.

    Credit:

    Ed Jones

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    Farmer Liu Qiyuan secures a hatch inside one of seven survival pods that he has also dubbed 'Noah's Arc', in a yard at his home in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing on December 11, 2012.

    Credit:

    Ed Jones

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    Workers reposition one of seven survival pods dubbed 'Noah's Arc' by creator, farmer Liu Qiyuan (L) in his yard at his home in the village of Qiantun, Hebei province, south of Beijing on December 11, 2012. Liu has built seven pods which are able to float on water, some of which have their own propulsion.

    Credit:

    Ed Jones

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    Inspired by the apocalyptic Hollywood movie '2012' and the 2004 Asian tsunami, Liu hopes that his creations consisting of a fibreglass shell around a steel frame will be adopted by government departments and international organizations for use in the event of tsunamis and earthquakes.

    Credit:

    Ed Jones

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    One of farmer Liu Qiyuan's survival pods.

    Credit:

    Ed Jones

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    Farmer Liu Qiyuan looks out from one of his survival pods.

    Credit:

    Ed Jones

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    A worker constructs one of Liu Qiyuan's survival pods in Hebei province.

    Credit:

    Ed Jones