Conflict & Justice

German Court Ruling May Aid Ailing Euro

For Wednesday's Geo Quiz we're looking for the city in the state of Baden-Wurttemburg, close to the border with France.

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The city was founded in 1715 around its beautiful palace.

It is a carefully, and beautifully, planned city. In fact, there's speculation that it served as an inspiration for the layout of Washington, DC.

Washington's planner Pierre Charles L'Enfant was given the plans for our German city before he began work on the new US capital.

One last clue from the news on Wednesday: This city now serves as the seat of Germany's Supreme Court. The city was chosen so the judicial branch wouldn't be too close to other seats of German political power – like Berlin and Frankfurt.

And today, many in Europe were watching the German Federal Constitutional Court, as it handed down a ruling that may give Europe's ailing economies some hope.

The answer is Karlsruhe, Germany.

Anchor Marco Werman speaks with The World's Clark Boyd about what the German Constitutional Court's ruling means for Europe's embattled single currency.

  • RTR37VBS-e1347476027550.jpg

    Credit: REUTERS
    President of the German Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht ) Andreas Vosskuhle announces the ruling on the European Stability Mechanism (ESM) and the fiscal pact at the court in Karlsruhe September 12, 2012. Germany's Constitutional Court said on Wednesday the country can ratify the euro zone's new rescue fund and budget pact as long it can guarantee there will be no increase in German financial exposure to the bailout fund without parliament's approval. Ruling that an injunction against the ESM and fiscal compact was largely unfounded, the court said one condition for allowing ratification was that any increase in German liability beyond 190 billion euros must first be approved by the Bundestag lower house of parliament. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach (GERMANY - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS CRIME LAW HEADSHOT)
  • Vosskuhle.jpg

    President of German Constitutional Court Vosskuhle announces ruling on German participation in Europe's new bailout fund.

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