government

Development & Education

Happy 50th birthday, Zambia!

The southern African nation of Zambia gained independence from Britain on October 24, 1964. Half a century later, it’s one of the most politically stable countries in the region. But as Zambia celebrates its 50th birthday, some Zambians are turning their attention to fixing the problems of the future.

Global Politics

Harvard researchers went undercover to reveal Chinese censorship tactics on the Internet

We all know about the so-called ‘Great Firewall of China,” the half-joking term for the barrier set up to prevent Western media from being consumed in China. And most of us assume there is a great deal of additional censorship with China itself. But until Gary King of Harvard University found a way to peer directly at the inner workings of Chinese censorship, no one knew exactly how it was done or what the Chinese were most serious about censoring.

Conflict & Justice

New York City's hijacked hashtag launches a global conversation on police brutality

Updated

When the New York Police Department encouraged its followers on Twitter to share photos of themselves with NYPD officers, the result was not what they expected. Two days later, the hashtag has been mimicked in a half dozen cities around the world to showcase police brutality. But the social media effort has had another consequence: it has started a global dialogue about the perception of police and policing in different cities.

Arts, Culture & Media

Citizenship? No thanks, I'll pass for now

Along with gaining the right to vote and the responsibility of serving on a jury, some studies show new citizens make clear economic gains as well. But not everyone buys it. Naturalization rates in the US are extremely low. Of the more than 8 million people with a US green card, less than 40 percent will go on to naturalize. That's nearly a third of the naturalization rate in our neighbor to the north, Canada.

Global Politics

The significance of the 1967 borders

Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu says Israel would be generous with the size of a Palestinian state but that the border could not rest at pre-1967 lines. The World's Matthew Bell visits the West Bank to see how the Jewish residents there view the debate.