Business, Finance & Economics

Shark killings in Ecuador rise

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Curious locals stand in pools of shark blood on the beach of Puerto Lopez, Ecuador fish market.

Credit:

Renee Frojo

Sharks are hunted worldwide to meet Asia’s insatiable appetite for shark-fin soup. According to several reports, as many as 73 million sharks are being killed every year for their fins. Conservation groups say that it has further threatened some sharks, such as hammerheads, which are already considered endangered species. 

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    Curious locals stand in pools of shark blood on the beach of Puerto Lopez, Ecuador fish market.

    Credit:

    Renee Frojo

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    Dozens of "accidentally caught" sicklefin smooth hounds are piled on the shore of this small fish market in Puerto Lopez in Ecuador.

    Credit:

    Renee Frojo

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    Several dozen juvenile hammerheads and sicklefin smooth hounds lay dead on the beach at a typical Saturday fish market in Puerto Lopez.

    Credit:

    Renee Frojo

  • ecuador-sharks003-2011-11-28.jpg

    Several dozen juvenile hammerheads and sicklefin smooth hounds lay dead on the beach at a typical Saturday fish market in Puerto Lopez.

    Credit:

    Renee Frojo

  • ecuador-sharks004-2011-11-28.jpg

    A bin full of dorsal and pectoral shark fins piles up at Puerto Lopez. Fins, worth between $25 and $100 a set, are the most sought after shark parts.

    Credit:

    Renee Frojo

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    Once a month, government officials come to Puerto Lopez to measure some of the landed sharks. The government has a fine placed on killing of sharks but rarely enforces those fines.

    Credit:

    Renee Frojo

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    An official from the fisheries department measures a shark for government records.

    Credit:

    Renee Frojo