For two years, Ismail al-Kanon and his mother, Jandar Nasi, were captives of ISIS. More than most living under the terror group’s rule, they had reason to expect that they would never escape — because they were Iraqi Christians.
For two years, Ismail al-Kanon and his mother, Jandar Nasi, were captives of ISIS. More than most living under the terror group’s rule, they had reason to expect that they would never escape — because they were Iraqi Christians. Here is the story of how they kept their faith, survived and escaped.
Riyad al-Jaboury, an Iraqi English teacher, with his birds in his yard in Hamam al-Alil, northern Iraq.
This Iraqi decided to become an English teacher while US troops were stationed in his town south of Mosul. When ISIS took over, they forced him — with death threats — to keep teaching, but to teach their version of facts.
Zikra Younis, right, and her daughter Huda at the Khazer camp for displaced people. The camp is east of the Iraqi city of Mosul, where they escaped from last November.
Zikra Younis aspired to be a radio journalist, even though her husband forbade it. Then ISIS came along.
A military aide carrying a briefcase containing nuclear codes follows President Barack Obama on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, before his departure to Miami, Oct. 20, 2016.
Despite all the change anticipated in Washington, we should expect continuity when it comes to nuclear weapons policy, says Ambassador Adam Scheinman, who has served as the State Department's special representative to the president for nuclear nonproliferation since 2014.
A child holds bullets picked from the ground, in Rounyn, a village located about 15 kilometers north of Shangil Tobaya, North Darfur, Sudan, on March 27, 2011.
Last week the Obama administration eased a 20-year trade embargo against Sudan, a nation the US still considers a sponsor of foreign terrorist organizations. Now, as the North African country looks to part with past alignments and improve US relations, it’s finding that battling extremism at home can be tricky business.
The elite oil and gas unit of the peshmerga near Kirkuk
A region once held up by the US as a beacon of hope in a broken Iraq, Kurdistan has instead —  in oil’s name — fallen victim to corruption and war.
Princess Diana walks through a minefield in Angola, 1997
In Jan. 15, 1997, Princess Diana walked through an active minefield in Angola. Here's how land mine ban advocate Paul Heslop, who helped Diana detonate a land mine in front of an audience of international reporters, remembers the day.
worker at the Fukushima plant
In the quest for a carbon-free future, scientists and entrepreneurs are developing a new generation of nuclear reactors.
Kerawa Cameroon Boko Haram
The president urged it. And locals in Mora, a remote mountainous district in northern Nigeria, said they would try anything to end the Islamic State’s reign of terror.
Golzow mayor Frank Schütz, left, leans over to whisper a question to Rasha Haimoud during a holiday concert. She and her husband, Ahmad Haimoud, are refugees who settled in the small former East German town after escaping the war in their native Syria
Compared to the rest of Germany, the economy in the former East Germany has struggled. In the small village of Golzow, the population had shrunk to the point where authorities were considering closing the village's only elementary school. That's when the town mayor invited Syrian refugee families to move in.

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