water

Science

How the Earth made its own water — out of rocks

Recent research has strongly suggested the ancient Earth was dry and could not support life until icy comets left behind the water necessary to create life as we know it. Now a new study suggests something very different: Our planet made its own water through geologic processes, and is still doing so all the time.

Culture

Why some Kenyan villagers take AK-47s to fetch water

On the border with South Sudan, is a Turkana village called Loblono, in Northern Kenya. These Turkana people have survived for centuries in one of the harshest landscapes on earth, the dry-as-a-bone desert that also stretches across South Sudan and Somalia. They live a nomadic lifestyle based on herding cattle, chasing the rain and the grasslands that sprout from the desert when it’s wet. The Turkana have always been in conflict with neighboring tribes, like the Poquot and the Taposas. But, in recent years, dwindling water supplies have exacerbated the conflict on this smallest of scales.

Environment

ISIS is using water as a weapon in Iraq

Iraq is in the middle of a drought. Now, the militant group ISIS has control over key dams and are using them in their bid to take over more land. Couple the insecurity with scarcer water due to climate change and you get a volatile mix that could spread unrest in the Middle East.

Pages

Conflict & Justice

How to fix Haiti's economy

In the aftermath of January's devastating earthquake there's a lot of talk about finally getting things right in Haiti, a sense that the opportunity to rebuild means the opportunity to fix what's been wrong. The World's Jeb Sharp reports.

Environment

Rename that fish!

Catfish farmers use Asian Carp to control algae. Some escaped, posing such a threat that the White House had an 'Asian Carp Summit'. One solution to deal with the carp population is to eat them, but, Alex Gallafent reports, the current name doesn't sell.

Arts, Culture & Media

Geo answer

The Answer to today's Geo Quiz is Tozeur, Tunisia, the starting point for four US and Canadian students who took 8 days to run across the Northern Sahara desert. Anchor Marco Werman speaks with one of the students, Jill Gilday.

Arts, Culture & Media

Geo Quiz / Geo answer

For today's Geo Quiz we were looking for another name for 'zero latitude.' The answer is the equator. Anchor Marco Werman speaks to David de Rothschild, who is aboard the Plastiki, a sailing vessel made in part of recycled plastic bottles.

Global Politics

Problem with the PlayPump

A water pump built into a children's merry-go-round. The idea was simple: It was meant to provide clean water for thousands of African villages. Philanthropists loved it. Until it fell apart. Amy Costello's gives us an update on today's show.