infrastructure

Business, Economics and Jobs

How to bring high-speed trains to the US

Japan's high speed trains run upwards of 200 miles per hour while Amtrak's Acela can only go its top speed of 150 for short stretches. The reason? Outdated infrastructure. After World War II, the US invested in cars, not trains, and today its passenger railways lag far behind countries in Europe and Asia. Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter lays out a new vision for US transportation in her book "Move: Putting America's Infrastructure Back in the Lead."

Business, Economics and Jobs

How to bring high-speed trains to the US

Japan's high speed trains run upwards of 200 miles per hour while Amtrak's Acela can only go its top speed of 150 for short stretches. The reason? Outdated infrastructure. After World War II, the US invested in cars, not trains, and today its passenger railways lag far behind countries in Europe and Asia. Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter lays out a new vision for US transportation in her book "Move: Putting America's Infrastructure Back in the Lead."

Politics

Ethiopia runs out of Coca-Cola

One impact of the global economic crisis in Ethiopia is a shortage of Coca Cola. Though it may not seem like a serious concern, the BBC's Elizabeth Blunt tells anchor Katy Clark why the Ethiopian government is treating it as a national emergency.

Conflict & Justice

Humanitarian simulation

The World's Katy Clark reports on a program that aims to prepare future aid workers for the harsh realities of humanitarian work by exposing them to a simulated refugee crisis. The exercise takes place in the woods of Massachusetts.