infrastructure

Business, Finance & Economics

How to bring high-speed trains to the US

Japan's high speed trains run upwards of 200 miles per hour while Amtrak's Acela can only go its top speed of 150 for short stretches. The reason? Outdated infrastructure. After World War II, the US invested in cars, not trains, and today its passenger railways lag far behind countries in Europe and Asia. Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter lays out a new vision for US transportation in her book "Move: Putting America's Infrastructure Back in the Lead."

Politics

Behind the Egyptian Crisis: Resource Stress?

The ongoing conflict in Egypt has deep roots in history, religion, politics and economics. But journalist Nafeez Mosaddeq Ahmed says another underlying cause is a growing resource crisis--shortages of food, water, energy, and a booming population.

Business, Finance & Economics

How to bring high-speed trains to the US

Japan's high speed trains run upwards of 200 miles per hour while Amtrak's Acela can only go its top speed of 150 for short stretches. The reason? Outdated infrastructure. After World War II, the US invested in cars, not trains, and today its passenger railways lag far behind countries in Europe and Asia. Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter lays out a new vision for US transportation in her book "Move: Putting America's Infrastructure Back in the Lead."

Politics

Quake victims at the G8

This year's G8 summit takes place in L'Aquila, the site of a devastating earthquake in April. Locals who've been living in tents since the quake are protesting. They say too much went into preparing for the G8 and too little into helping L'Aquila recover.

Politics

Euro inches up on word of deal

European leaders spent weeks hammering out an agreement aimed at shoring up confidence in the Euro and in the countries who use it. They finally agreed on a plan to bail out debt-ridden Greece. The World's Laura Lynch reports.