aid

Conflict

Efforts to deploy drones for humanitarian purposes are hampered by public fears

Drones may be best known for their surveillance and military capabilities, but there’s a growing movement to use them for humanitarian aid. Inventor Mark Jacobsen is building drones to deliver humanitarian aid to Syrians stuck inside their war-torn country. But as he’s learning, bureaucracy — combined with public fears about the use of drones — has hamstrung efforts to get that aid anywhere near the Syrian border.

Development

How drones are helping relief efforts in Nepal

Updated

Global Medic, an aid agency based in Canada, is using drones — or UAVs — to help scope out remote areas in need of aid. And while they can't deliver supplies just yet, the group says they're still a vital way to get quick results when disasters hit.

Development

Human interest stories obscure the real human needs in Nepal

Days after the earthquake hit Nepal, Shrochis Karki says some rural villages have still seen few signs of help. And while he's been working from his home in England to coordinate relief efforts, he says part of the blame lies with the world's fixation on dramatic human interest stories and not real problems.

Development

Human interest stories obscure the real human needs in Nepal

Days after the earthquake hit Nepal, Shrochis Karki says some rural villages have still seen few signs of help. And while he's been working from his home in England to coordinate relief efforts, he says part of the blame lies with the world's fixation on dramatic human interest stories and not real problems.

Development

How drones are helping relief efforts in Nepal

Updated

Global Medic, an aid agency based in Canada, is using drones — or UAVs — to help scope out remote areas in need of aid. And while they can't deliver supplies just yet, the group says they're still a vital way to get quick results when disasters hit.

Conflict

Efforts to deploy drones for humanitarian purposes are hampered by public fears

Drones may be best known for their surveillance and military capabilities, but there’s a growing movement to use them for humanitarian aid. Inventor Mark Jacobsen is building drones to deliver humanitarian aid to Syrians stuck inside their war-torn country. But as he’s learning, bureaucracy — combined with public fears about the use of drones — has hamstrung efforts to get that aid anywhere near the Syrian border.