Culture

Seeing the art and culture of the Havana Biennial

Rachel Valdés Camejo's Composición Infinita_Sonia Narang_CROP.jpg

A beautiful sound and light installation with mirrors by 24-year-old Cuban artist Rachel Valdés Camejo. I met Rachel on my last day in Havana, and just had to check out her exhibition before heading to the airport after an amazing week at the Havana Bienn

A beautiful sound and light installation with mirrors by 24-year-old Cuban artist Rachel Valdés Camejo. I met Rachel on my last day in Havana, and just had to check out her exhibition before heading to the airport after an amazing week at the Havana Biennial.

Credit:

Sonia Narang

Sonia Narang recently traveled to Cuba as a tourist to see the Havana Biennial, a monthlong international arts extravaganza boasting massive outdoor sculptures, installations and even an ice rink right on Havana's oceanfront Malecón. She posted these photos to her Instagram and shared them with us here.

Safaa Erruas' Fuente de Espinas_Sonia Narang.JPG

Moroccan artist Safaa Erruas created her Havana Biennial piece — an Arabic-style fountain with white barbed wire poles sticking out — as a statement on political boundaries. The installation is called “Fuente de Espinas,” or “Fountain of Thorns,” in Engli

Moroccan artist Safaa Erruas created her Havana Biennial piece — an Arabic-style fountain with white barbed wire poles sticking out — as a statement on political boundaries. The installation is called “Fuente de Espinas,” or “Fountain of Thorns,” in English. “The barbed wire spikes are a reference to borders,” Erruas said. “At first, you don’t see the borders, since nothing appears at first as what’s reality,” she said.

Credit:

Sonia Narang

Violinist Alejandro Junco at Biennial_Sonia Narang.JPG

Violinist Alejandro Junco chats with a young classical music fan at an art exhibition in Havana. He's a graduate of Cuba's prestigious arts school, Instituto Superior de Arte (ISA). I met Alejandro as he played solo violin inside the ruins of an old build

Violinist Alejandro Junco chats with a young classical music fan at an art exhibition in Havana. He's a graduate of Cuba's prestigious arts school, Instituto Superior de Arte (ISA). I met Alejandro as he played solo violin inside the ruins of an old building that was transformed into an art venue for the Havana Biennial.

Credit:

Sonia Narang

Zona Franca_Sonia Narang.JPG

Havana's 18th-century fortress La Cabaña is one of the many spectacular venues for the Havana Biennial. Called Zona Franca, the art exhibition has turned dozens upon dozens of fortress rooms into innovative galleries all month long.

Havana's 18th-century fortress La Cabaña is one of the many spectacular venues for the Havana Biennial. Called Zona Franca, the art exhibition has turned dozens upon dozens of fortress rooms into innovative galleries all month long.

Credit:

Sonia Narang

Traffic free Malecón_Sonia Narang.JPG

Opening weekend of the Havana Biennial, a stretch of the Malecón was closed to traffic. Only on rare occasions can pedestrians walk down Cuba's most famous sea-facing esplanade without cars.

Opening weekend of the Havana Biennial, a stretch of the Malecón was closed to traffic. Only on rare occasions can pedestrians walk down Cuba's most famous sea-facing esplanade without cars.

Credit:

Sonia Narang

 

In Arts, Culture & MediaCulture.

Tagged: HavanaCubaHavana Biennial.