Poverty is one of the most pressing and divisive issues of our day, and Democrats and Republicans have staked out largely different approaches to the increasing divide between the poorest members of the United States and the richest. With the economy central to the November elections, the wealth gap will likely only become even more talked about in the months to come.  Peter Edelman  is one of the most outspoken antipoverty advocates in the country. Edelman became a household name in 1996 after resigning from his post at the Department of Health and Human Services in protest of President Clinton's signing of the welfare reform bill. In his new book, "So Rich, So Poor: Why It's So Hard to End Poverty in America," he examines the current state of poverty in the country, and elaborates upon what can be done – and what hasn't. To read the conclusion of "So Rich, So Poor," click here.