Rangers entice a dragon down the white-sand beach using a piece of meat wrapped in cloth. Komodo dragons are known for their acute sense of smell, which attracts them to prey.

The view of Komodo National Park from a hill atop Rinca Island, one of two main islands where tourists go to see Komodo dragons.
Komodo dragons lurk in the shade on Rinca Island. Rangers say the dragons have become more aggressive due to increased competition for food.
Rangers warn tourists to stay at least three meters from the lizards, but many push their luck to get the perfect picture.
Andi Kefi monitors the ecosystem at Komodo National Park to ensure the dragon's numbers remain stable and their habitat escapes damage. He worries more visitors could cause problems if the rangers don't get more support from the government.
Seeing these prehistoric creatures in the wild is a main draw for tourists, who come from all over the world.
A fence on Rinca Island collects the remains of buffalo that have fallen victim to the dragons.
The Indonesian Ministry of Tourism is promoting Komodo and several other remote islands this year in an effort to draw more tourist revenue to the country. But critics say infrastructure must first be improved.
Many of the villagers on Komodo Island make their living from selling woodcarvings and other souvenirs to visitors. The Ministry of Tourism hopes an increase in the number of tourists will help improve livelihoods.
A group of tourists walk along the path to the Komodo National Park office, where rangers give them a briefing on how to stay safe while touring the island.
A map at the ranger station on Komodo Island shows the layout of the national park and its surrounding territory.
Rangers entice a dragon down the white-sand beach using a piece of meat wrapped in cloth. Komodo dragons are known for their acute sense of smell, which attracts them to prey.

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