In Austrlia there's great hope that the new romantic adventure movie, "Australia," starring Nicole Kidman and Hugh Jackman will so enthrall viewers that they will want to see the country for themselves.

"The Takeaway" talks to BBC correspondent Nick Bryant about the hopes around the movie: "Huge hopes -- they're hoping it will replicate the "Crocodile Dundee" effect. There used to be a very simple way of promoting Australia -- you just bring up Paul Hogan, the star of Crocodile Dundee and let him unleash his ... charm, and this had a huge affect in the 1980s."

The movie is about a noble woman, Nicole Kidman, on a cattle-drive in Australia during World War II: "It's really three stories in one. One is this romance between Hugh Jackman, who plays this ... rough-hewn Aussie cattle driver, and Nicole Kidman plays this British aristocrat who travels to Australia after she's learned that she's inherited some land.

"There's a second story as well, it concerns a stolen generation -- these Aboriginal children taken away and put in government settlements -- a huge controversy in Australia over the past hundred years or so.

"And a Japanese attack on Darwin, that's in the Northern territory in Australia, and attack which took place during World War II.

"So there are these three stories taking place at the same time -- embroidered together by director Baz Luhrmann of "Moulin Rouge" fame. A lot of people are suggesting the film lasts too long, that he tried to do too much. It's the most expensive movie that's ever been made on Australian soil, he's Australia's creative genius on the cinema front, but there are some people who are saying, 'Baz, it was just too long.'"

"The Takeaway" is PRI's new national morning news program, delivering the news and analysis you need to catch up, start your day, and prepare for what’s ahead. The show is a co-production of WNYC and PRI, in editorial collaboration with the BBC, The New York Times Radio, and WGBH.

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