Nobel Peace Prize shines a light on freedom of expression

October 08, 2021

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Maria Ressa, center, the award-winning head of a Philippine online news site Rappler, is escorted into the court room to post bail at a Regional Trial Court following an overnight arrest by National Bureau of Investigation agents on a libel case Thursday,

Maria Ressa, center, the award-winning head of a Philippine online news site Rappler, is escorted into the courtroom to post bail at a Regional Trial Court following an overnight arrest by National Bureau of Investigation agents on a libel case, Feb. 14, 2019, in the Philippines. 

Credit:

Bullit Marquez/AP

For the first time since 1935, the Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to journalists: Maria Ressa of the Philippines, and Russian independent journalist Dmitry Muratov. The award honors their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression against the growing threats against it. And it’s election time in Iraq, where a high-stakes parliamentary vote will take place on Sunday. The election was called a year early in response to major protests in 2019. Plus, for nearly two centuries since Ludwig van Beethoven's death, his 10th Symphony sat unfinished and largely untouched. But with a little help from modern technology — that’s about to change.

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