Melbourne under lockdown again following coronavirus spike

July 10, 2020

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The entrance to Flinders Street train station is shown with nine clocks along the top and nearly empty of people.

The normally busy Flinders Street train station is seen mostly devoid of people after lockdown restrictions were implemented in response to an outbreak of the coronavirus in Melbourne, Australia, July 10, 2020.

Credit:

Sandra Sanders/Reuters

While the US struggles to contain its first surge of COVID-19, Melbourne, home to nearly 5 million Australians, is on its second lockdown. And, Canada’s ethics commissioner is looking into allegations that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau violated the country’s conflict of interest law over his ties to a children’s charity. Also, over the course of the coronavirus pandemic, hundreds of anonymous letters have been traded in Medellín, Colombia, through a project called Love in the Time of Coronavirus — inspired by the famous Gabriel García Márquez novel.

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Justice

25 years after Srebrenica massacre, int'l crimes are still difficult to prosecute

In 1990, Bosnian Serb forces killed about 8,000 Muslim men and boys during the Balkan conflict in what’s now known as the Srebrenica massacre. It was the worst atrocity on European soil since World War II. But 25 years on, war crimes and crimes against humanity are rarely prosecuted. David Scheffer, who was the US ambassador-at-large for war crimes issues from 1997 to 2001, explains why.