How Sweden influenced Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's worldview

September 21, 2020

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Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is shown sitting in a tan-color armchair and wearing a dark jacket with large buttons on the front.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg attends an event at Georgetown Law, Oct. 2019.

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

In the early 1960s, long before she was a Supreme Court justice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg traveled to Sweden to research a book project with legal scholar Anders Bruzelius. Her time there shaped her views on equality and the law. Also, surgeon and author Dr. Atul Gawande says nations such as South Korea have implemented successful COVID-19 testing and safety procedures that the US could easily emulate. And, in a stunning climax to the Tour de France, a 22-year-old cyclist beat his older countryman and became the first Slovenian to win cycling's most prestigious race.

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