Coronavirus Conversations: Are countries prepared for a coronavirus surge?

July 13, 2020

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A man is shown wearing medical protective clothing and a face mask while holding open a plastic door.

A medical worker opens a makeshift door to the United Memorial Medical Center's coronavirus intensive care unit in Houston, Texas, June 29, 2020. 

Credit:

Callaghan O'Hare/Reuters

After months of social distancing and lockdown measures to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, some countries are reopening. But fears of a second wave of COVID-19 infections are concerning. As part of our regular series discussing the pandemic and as a special podcast in The World's feed, reporter Elana Gordon moderated a conversation with William Hanage, associate professor of epidemiology at Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health. 

Watch and listen to more of The World's Coronavirus Conversation series here.

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Top of The World

China announces sanctions targeting Rubio, Cruz; Polish President Andrzej Duda reelected; Remembering Zindzi Mandela

China announced retaliatory sanctions on Monday against the United States for “interfering in China’s internal affairs.” And, Polish President Andrzej Duda has won another term in office after an election runoff held on Sunday. Also, Zindzi Mandela, daughter of former South African president and anti-apartheid revolutionary Nelson Mandela, has died.

Coronavirus Conversations

Discussion: Can advances in testing counter surging COVD-19 cases?

Updated

The surge in coronavirus cases around the world led by states like Florida in the US serves as a reminder of the urgent need for more testing. But those who can get a test must sometimes wait days for the results. As part of our regular discussion series on the coronavirus, The World's Elana Gordon moderated a discussion with epidemiologist Michael Mina, from Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health who addressed the latest advances in COVID-19 testing.

Global Politics

Former US diplomat attests to racial discrimination in diplomatic corps

Tianna Spears says she faced racial discrimination as a US consular officer abroad. "America loses, first of all, when we're not an inclusive society and when we're not welcoming to others," she told The World. "But secondly, when we're overseas at our embassies and consulates abroad, we have a great opportunity to advance diplomacy and show what America truly represents."