Full story - April 06, 2017
Truth and Reconciliation
After decades of institutionalized racism under apartheid, South Africa's Truth & Reconciliation Commission helped a divided nation watch, weep, reflect & come together — even if imperfectly. What is its legacy now, two decades later? How much of the hope South Africans had for what their future might be together has been borne out? Host Mary Kay Magistad visited South Africa to see how South Africans from different communities feel about what difference the TRC has, and hasn't, made in their lives.
Full episode - April 06, 2017
Scene in Elsie's River, one of the Cape Flats communities on the outskirts of Cape Town, South Africa
Healing deep social wounds takes time, even with active effort.
Full story - March 15, 2017
Jedwabne
Memory can be slippery, especially when there's incentive to forget, or misremember. In the Polish village of Jedwabne, residents long said Nazis were responsible for the massacre, one hot day in July 1941, of hundreds of Jews in the village. Then evidence emerged that the villagers of Jedwabne had killed their own neighbors.
Full episode - March 24, 2017
Jedwabne, Poland synagogue in 19th century
What happens when neighbors kill neighbors? What happens when the perpetrators try to bury the past? The past can still both shape and haunt the present, as the villagers of the small Polish town of Jedwabne have found, decades after other villagers there rounded up and killed hundreds of their Jewish neighbors. The World's Nina Porzucki visits the village to see how that past is remembered, and who's willing to talk about it.
Full story - March 08, 2017
Street scene in Amman, Jordan
Get a good education, and the world's your oyster, right? Not necessarily, if you're a woman in Jordan. While Jordan has one of the highest female literacy rates in the Middle East, and there are more women in college there than men, gender discrimination still abounds in the workplace. This is not just costing women, it's costing Jordan — half to almost a full percentage point of GDP growth each year, says the Brookings Institution. What's at play here? Jordanian lawyer and human rights activist Asma Khader shares her thoughts with The World's Shirin Jaafari.
Full episode - March 08, 2017
Jordanian lawyer and human rights activist Asma Khader, left, with The World's Shirin Jaafari
Women around the world face varying degrees of gender discrimination in the workplace — whether they're hired, how much they're paid, whether they advance as fast as men doing the same job. In Jordan, where girls and women generally do better than their male counterparts in school, and where more women than men attend college, startlingly few women participate in the workforce. Why? Asma Khader, a Jordanian lawyer, women's rights activist and former government official, weighs in, in conversation with The World's Shirin Jaafari.
Full episode - February 23, 2017
Internet Archive staff in San Francisco
Librarians rock. And Internet Archive librarians, aiming to digitize and make universally available all human knowledge, including saving webpages that would otherwise disappear? They're on a whole 'nother level. In this age of alternative facts and disappearing government websites, hear how this small group of badass librarians is working to preserve knowledge, and empower investigative reporters and ordinary citizens to find webpages those with something to hide would rather you didn't find.
Full episode - February 09, 2017
Drones
Drones have only been around for a couple of decades, but already, they're reshaping the contours of conflict and raising ethical quandaries. President Barack Obama launched more than 500 drone strikes during his tenure, 10 times more than President George W. Bush. But Obama's drones strikes killed far fewer civilians than did Bush's intervention in Iraq. Still, how much should drones and robotics be used in conflict, and when, and what unintended consequences might this unleash? Peter Singer, Strategist at the New America Foundation and author of "Wired for War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century" talks with The World's Jeb Sharp.
Full story - February 08, 2017
A crew chief completes a post flight inspection of a Predator drone on Sept. 15, 2004 at Balad Air Base, Iraq.
Drones and robotics, and their potential uses, are advancing faster than policy and the human moral compass can easily keep up. How and when best to use these technologies in conflict and law enforcement, for strategic gain and to minimize loss of life? What crosses the line? Peter Singer, New America Foundation strategist and author of "Wired for War," weighs in.
Full story - January 27, 2017
Saiko and Max Reynard, joining the San Francisco Women's March
America's global leadership over the past century hasn't always been perfect, but it's usually been respected. That may be changing under President Trump. But the new US president's words and actions are also mobilizing those who have a different idea of what makes America great, and who don't want to see it disappear.

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