Nearly a month after the House of Representatives took two historic votes to impeach the 45th president of the United States, the case moves to the Senate for trial. Follow The World's continuing coverage on the trial here.

Gaza Strip residents have struggled to get fuel for their vehicles because of a variety of factors that have led to a severe shortage of gasoline and diesel. Perhaps worse, though, the only power plant in Gaza runs on diesel so a fuel shortage has meant 18 hours a day without electricity.
Pakistan has a very small but devoted community of stand-up comics. It may be no larger than three men, but they've got a niche audience and are looking to propel their relative success in Pakistan's urban area to international attention as well.
After World War II, millions of Ukrainians became refugees when the Soviet Union began ethnic cleansing. George Orwell's novel "Animal Farm" became popular among Ukrainian refugees, as it reminded them of the hardships they endured under Stalinist rule.
Politics in post-apartheid South Africa is dominated by two political parties: The Democratic Alliance, which is seen as a party of white and mixed-race voters, and the African National Congress, which is supported primarily by black voters. Recently, the Democratic Alliance has tried to attract more black voters and become the new majority party.
Humans have used fire for hundreds of thousands of years -- and used it in myriad ways. But a new study out this week, based on research in South Africa, shows that humans — or more precisely, their ancestors -- may have been using fire as much as a million years ago.
America's Filipino population is among the fastest growing ethnic groups in the country. That's particularly the case in swing state Nevada, which could give them great impact on upcoming elections. But divisions among the community may prevent them from achieving that political influence.
Officials and advocates say that Europe and the United States should use the seemingly successful Myanmar elections as a reason to justify a broad rollback of the sanctions that have been levied against the southeast Asian nation for decades.
In Swaziland, the strained relationship between religious leaders and public health officials is improving, if slightly. The two groups are trying to work together more as the country battles an HIV infection rate among adults that may be as high as 25 percent.
Sunday's elections in Myanmar mark the end of the beginning of a time of fundamental change for that nation's democratic activists. No longer confined to the margins, some organizations are wondering there's still a rationale for their existence.
Recent attention and criticism of Liberia's cultural practice of female genital cutting may have had a positive impact. Or, at the very least, something has changed. A group of female traditional leaders announced what amounts to a four-year suspension of the practice -- and the government is trying to make that suspension permanent.

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