Fifty years ago, astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed the Apollo Lunar Module and took their first steps on the Moon. Hundreds of millions of people around the world watched history taking place. You've probably seen the famous pictures, but here are some lesser-known facts about the historic mission.

At Cerro Negro, extreme sports junkies have a new adventure: volcano boarding. Traveling at nearly 60 mph, they careen down the mountain on plywood boards the size of snow sleds.
For almost 100 years, the Australian government maintained a policy of forcibly taking Aborigine children from their families and putting them with white families. Some, like Levon Ennis, were even sent abroad. Ennis is now trying to reconnect with his heritage and find his place in the world.
Public sector employees in the United Kingdom left their jobs and took to the streets on Wednesday to protest what they say is unfair negotiating and an unfair plan to cut their pensions. The government says it needs the cuts to balance the budget.
As Secretary of State Hillary Clinton visits Myanmar, ethnic violence continues around the country. State Department officials say Clinton will meet with leaders of ethnic minorities.
Governments around the world are investing in training "kids" in cyber hacking in the hopes that they could be useful in a cyber war. And in this emerging area of warfare, the advantages the United States often has in warfare may not apply.
Samira Ibrahim is speaking out against mistreatment she said she was subjected to by the Egyptian Army. The Tahrir Square protester said she was detained back in March, beaten and abused, including being subject to a "virginity test."
For the Peace Corps, there's a group of untapped Americans it's hoping to turn to as volunteers. The organization is partnering with the AARP to try and reach more retirement-age people.
Romania's public healthcare system is under fire for being woefully inadequate. According to many, the poor will wait years for even basic services, doctors are leaving the profession or going overseas to practice medicine.
Lines were dozens and sometimes hundreds deep as Egyptians turned out for what they hoped are the country's free and fair elections, and were certainly the first elections since the overthrow of former President Hosni Mubarak.
Though he's still living, Nelson Mandela, the revered former leader of South Africa, makes fewer and fewer public appearances. Now 93, many South Africans are preparing for the day Nelson Mandela will no longer be alive.

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