Full story - December 17, 2008
OPEC announced today that it's cutting 2 million barrels from its production. The move is aimed at raising the price of crude oil to around $75 a barrel. The World's Aaron Schachter reports.
Full story - December 17, 2008
English novelist Charles Dickens often published his novels in serial form. The stories would be broken down into installments to be read over time.
Full story - December 17, 2008
Music fans are using the internet as a battleground to campaign for their favorite cover version of Leonard Cohen's 1984 love song "Hallelujah." The World's Alex Gallafent tells the story to anchor Lisa Mullins.
Full story - December 17, 2008
The World's Quil Lawrence reports from the Gaza Strip, where cash is in short supply for political reasons.
Full story - December 17, 2008
The BBC's Aleem Maqbool is re-tracing the route taken by Mary and Joseph in the biblical Christmas story on their journey from Nazareth to Bethlehem. And as the story goes, Mary and Joseph traveled by donkey.
Full story - December 17, 2008
There are growing reports that young people in South Africa are stealing an AIDS medication, called Efavirenz, and using it as a recreational drug. The World's Laura Lynch reports from Johannesburg.
Full story - December 18, 2008
Dozens of security officials from Iraq's Interior Ministry have been arrested. They're accused of being connected to a group created by supporters of Saddam Hussein's now-banned Baathist Party. The World's Matthew Bell reports.
Full story - December 18, 2008
The Office of the Historian at the State Department is tasked with writing the official history of U.S. foreign policy. By law it must create a "thorough, reliable and accurate" record of U.S. foreign policy. The tradition dates back to 1861.
Full story - December 17, 2008
Tiger in India
Can you name a national park located in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh. The park itself sprawls over an area of 25,000 acres right in the heart of India.
Full story - December 17, 2008
When Iranian rock musicians can't get government approval to play in public, they jam and perform in friends' basements. They call them "Kiosks." And it's a name adopted by an Iranian band in the U.S. Reporter Betto Arcos has the story.

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