The coronavirus pandemic has exposed entrenched health inequities for communities of color in the US and around the globe. As part of our regular series discussing the pandemic and as a special podcast in The World's feed, reporter Elana Gordon moderated a conversation with Nancy Krieger from Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Krieger recently co-authored an analysis confirming the extent of such disparities.

Full story - July 22, 2020
A car and an SUV are shown in blurred motion passing by the China Consulate General in Houston.
The United States has ordered China to close its consulate in Houston. And, the self-confessed middleman in the 2017 murder of Maltese journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia is in critical condition with knife wounds today, hours before he was due to give evidence in the case. Also, US President Donald Trump has signed a memorandum that would prevent undocumented immigrants in the US from being counted when US congressional voting districts are next redrawn.
Full story - July 21, 2020
Jacob Cuenca, 18, a registered Republican, poses outside his home in Homestead, Florida, on May 21, 2020.
The coronavirus pandemic turned Jacob Cuenca’s life upside down just before he graduated high school. It's also changed his politics. The Latino teen, who registered as a Republican in March, has switched from a reluctant supporter of President Donald Trump to hesitant supporter of presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden.
Full episode - July 21, 2020
The dark lens of a security camera is shown with a Russian Federation flag in soft focus in the background.
Britain's government failed to determine and "actively avoided" looking into whether Russia meddled in the country’s recent elections, according to a much-anticipated intelligence report. And, after a long legal battle, the Thai Supreme Court has acquitted British human rights activist Andy Hall of defamation charges. And life under lockdown is stressful — perhaps a good, long scream would help? People in Iceland think it's worth a shot.
Full story - July 21, 2020
A nurse talks with police.
Officials say the arrests stem from so-called violations of coronavirus-related sanitation and safety measures. But critics say these arrests specifically target opposition voices. Dr. Norman Matara, with the Zimbabwe Association of Doctors for Human Rights in Chinhoyi, Zimbabwe, spoke with The World's Carol Hills.
Full episode - July 21, 2020
The Sydney Opera House is shown at night lit up with photographs from the FIFA Women's World Cup.
From The World and PRX, this is The Number in the News. Today’s number: 2. The 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup has big shoes to fill. The 2019 competition drew a record-setting 1.1 billion viewers around the world, and the players made major waves calling for pay equity in the sport. With the recent announcement that two countries — Australia and New Zealand — will co-host the 2023 tournament, players are confident the next World Cup will be just as momentous.
Full story - July 21, 2020
A man stands in front of the Skogafoss waterfall in Skogar, Iceland, March 8, 2020.
A new stress-relieving campaign, rooted in primal therapy, asks people across the globe to record their screams and submit them online to be played in wide-open spaces in Iceland.
Full story - July 21, 2020
A man wearing a red top hat with the Russian hammer a sickle is shown holding a sign that says, "Thanks for the Russian Brexit through.
Britain's government failed to determine and "actively avoided" looking into whether Russia meddled in the country. And, European Union leaders reached a $857 billion deal on a massive stimulus plan. Also, the US announced sanctions against a new group of 11 Chinese companies, accusing them of alleged involvement in human rights violations against Uighurs.
Full story - July 20, 2020
A migrant father and child returns to Ciudad Juárez after he had his family's court dates changed by Customs and Border Protection on the Paso del Norte International Bridge after court cancelations amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Ciud
The US immigration system is situated within the Department of Justice, a law enforcement agency. That's always been a problem, explains Judge Ashley Tabaddor. But under the Trump administration, immigration judges have faced "unprecedented micromanagement" — and it's causing many of them to resign or retire early.
Full story - July 20, 2020
A large crowd of people are shown with a women featured in the center of the photograph holding a sign that reads, racism kills, mentally. physically. globally.
The coronavirus pandemic has exposed entrenched health inequities for communities of color in the US and around the globe. As part of our regular series discussing COVID-19, The World's Elana Gordon moderated a conversation with Nancy Krieger from Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Krieger recently co-authored an analysis confirming the extent of such disparities.
Full episode - July 20, 2020
An older man is shown seated and with his mouth open wide with a doctor wearing a face mask looking into his mouth.
Scientists at Oxford University published the results Monday of an early-phase coronavirus vaccine experiment showing strong immune response and no early safety concerns. And, for four days now, leaders from the European Union's 27 member states have been locking horns over the EU’s coronavirus recovery package. Plus Italian police found cocaine inside hollowed out coffee beans. Investigators were tipped off when a shipment of coffee beans from Colombia arrived addressed to Santino D’Antonio, the name of a mafia boss in the action film “John Wick: Chapter 2.”

Pages