Global pressures on the Mississippi River

September 03, 2019

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An older dock is shown extending out into the Mississippi River.

A dock extends out into the Mississippi River in Buras, Louisiana. Engineers, environmentalists, shippers, farmers and the oil and gas industry are all trying to find better solutions to confront new challenges facing the river. Some groups and activists who've historically been adversaries are now working together. “We want to live here, so how we do that? We’ve got to compromise. That’s it. If we don’t compromise, none of us will be here,” said Louisiana duck hunter Albertine Kimble.

Credit:

Leyland Cecco/The World

We take a break from our usual way of doing things at The World, and take a 40-minute, 1,000-mile journey down the Mississippi with reporter Jason Margolis. The Mississippi is a critical trade corridor that delivers US goods and commodities to the rest of the world and brings goods into the US from abroad. But up and down the Mississippi, new pressures are being put on America’s inland hydro highway, a strain that's only becoming more acute with the impacts of climate change. Also, we're following the latest developments on Brexit and protests in Hong Kong. And, what are the links between Hurricane Dorian and climate change?

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The Mississippi: Pushed to the brink

Up and down the Mississippi River, new pressures are being put on America’s inland hydro highway, which helps deliver US goods and commodities to the rest of the world and allows trade flows to return. The strain on the river system is only becoming more acute with the impacts of climate change.