Full story - February 22, 2008
Some scientists say the best place to grow the next generation of pharmaceutical drugs is within food crops. Living on Earth's Helen Palmer talks with Steve Curwood on recent scientific advancements in all things food and pharma.
Full story - February 27, 2009
Just how much water goes into making your hamburger or the jeans you're wearing? It's called a 'water footprint' and as global water supplies dwindle, some are trying to raise awareness about the water cost of our daily consumption.
Full story - June 06, 2008
Investors have been pouring money into clean technology. Elise Potaka reports that money is increasingly following the technology to China.
Full story - July 16, 2010
From anthems about clean energy to ballads on fresh fruit, a number of hip hop's socially conscious artists are on a green streak. Living on Earth and Planet Harmony's Ike Sriskandarajah explores the greening of hip hop. From Living on Earth.
Full story - April 18, 2008
More and more companies are finding ways to make economic growth with environmental benchmarks part of their mandates. Fred Krupp, author of 'Earth: The Sequel' and president of Environmental Defense Fund, tells host Steve Curwood, the profit motive that helped create global warming can also help solve it.
Full story - May 08, 2009
Jaguars travel amazing distances on their migration routes. Host Jeff Young talks with Dr. Alan Rabinowitz, president of the conservationist group, Panthera, about a novel way to get humans to co-exist with cats.
Full story - October 31, 2008
One city's plan to get fuel from human refuse. Sandy Larson reports.
Full story - June 13, 2008
Animal manure on industrial farms can wreak environmental havoc. At the University of Guelph in Ontario, microbiologist Cecil Forsberg has found a solution to the problem. He genetically modified pigs to produce low-phosphorous manure.
Full story - August 28, 2009
Just how much water goes into making the jeans you're wearing? It's called a 'water footprint' and as global water supplies dwindle, some are trying to raise awareness about the water cost of our daily consumption.
Full story - May 08, 2009
Three years after endorsing the use of DDT in poor countries to control malaria, the World Health Organization is reversing its policy. Brenda Eskenazi, an epidemiologist at UC Berkeley, talks with Living on Earth's Steve Curwood.

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