Full story - May 11, 2021
Pedestrians cross a busy street in Kinshasa.
Critical State, our foreign policy newsletter, takes a deep dive into new research on how rebels negotiate the international business world, with a focus on Democratic Republic of Congo.
Full story - May 04, 2021
Two men in camouflage carry guns in a rice paddy in Vietnam.
Critical State, our foreign policy newsletter, takes a deep dive into the weaponization of water.
Full story - April 27, 2021
A woman weeps while holding a picture of her dead son, with a hand to her cheek, and eyes closed.
This week, Critical State takes a deep dive into new research on the objects that make up the world of political violence.
Full story - April 20, 2021
Smoke billows from stacks against a setting sun.
This week, Critical State, our foreign policy newsletter, takes a deep dive into the challenges of assigning blame when it comes to natural disasters and climate change.
Full story - April 13, 2021
A group of men gather around a memorial to plant flowers for victims of a militant attack.
Critical State, our foreign policy newsletter, takes a deep dive into new research on how blame gets apportioned in international politics, and how that affects unstable security situations.
Full story - April 06, 2021
In this Jan. 8, 2019, file photo, US Army troops training to serve as instructors participate in the new Army combat fitness test at the 108th Air Defense Artillery Brigade compound at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. 
This week, Critical State, our foreign policy newsletter, takes a deep dive into recent research on the state of US opinion about gender in foreign policy in the years since combat units were integrated.
Full story - March 30, 2021
Military men and women exercise in a field.
January marked five years since the US military opened up combat arms billets to women, shifting the way women are treated within the military and the way the US government thinks about gender and security.
Full story - March 23, 2021
A mock North Korea's Scud-B missile, center right, and South Korean missiles are displayed at Korea War Memorial Museum in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, March 18, 2021. 
Critical State, our foreign policy newsletter, looks at new research on how leadership transitions — or, rather, the threat of leadership transitions — can actually increase the likelihood of peace in certain situations.
Full episode - March 16, 2021
Things That Go Boom Season 3 logo with an illustration that includes a magnifying glass, a rocket, a coin, and the US Capitol building.
In December 2020, the company FireEye noticed that it had been the victim of a cyberintrusion. And it wasn’t the only one. About 18,000 companies and government agencies were breached — everything from the agency that controls America’s nuclear weapons to the agency that regulates the electric grid to a company whose products you probably use every day: Microsoft. So, what did they have in common? They were all using the same software monitoring service: a platform called Orion, from the company SolarWinds. The breach leaves the US open to nightmare scenario after nightmare scenario. In this episode of "Things That Go Boom," The World's partner podcast from PRX, host Laicie Heeley examines how we got here, and explores how can we prevent similar attacks in the future.
Full story - March 16, 2021
A rocket goes off with fire underneath it.
This week, Critical State, our weekly foreign policy newsletter, takes a deep dive into new research on what to expect as norms about foreign policy continuity in the US continue to erode.

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