Full story - September 22, 2020
Two people carry luggage down a bombed out street in Mosul.
Critical State takes a deep dive into one of the most fundamental choices civilians make in wartime: whether to stay in their homes and live under the control of an armed group that has conquered their city — or to abandon their homes and flee to somewhere they hope will be safer.
Full story - September 15, 2020
A sign with the written word nazi in black appears near the blue lights of a police vehicle
Critical State takes a deep dive into scholar Anna Meier's new article that examines why the German government is so bad at responding to white supremacist violence.
Full story - September 08, 2020
Military tanks pass by a building featuring traditional Chinese architecture.
Neoconservative intellectuals have long turned perceptions of East Asian culture into ammunition for a global political agenda, according to historian Jennifer Miller. Critical State takes a deep dive into Miller's new article that charts these patterns.
Full story - September 01, 2020
Macron and Trump stand near a podium
The COVID-19 pandemic has often been portrayed as a system-altering shock to international relations. Critical State takes a deep dive into the work of political scientist Daniel Drezner, who predicts that COVID-19 will result in a greater entrenchment of existing international power structures.
Full story - August 25, 2020
A line of trucks snake down the motorway
How likely are governments to implement border restrictions to fight a pandemic? Critical State takes a deep dive into new research by political scientists Michael Kenwick and Beth Simmons that examines border closures as a measure to contain the coronavirus.
Full episode - August 20, 2020
Things That Go Boom Season 3 logo with an illustration that includes a magnifying glass, a rocket, a coin, and the US Capitol building.
Why did the US Navy reinstate celestial navigation as part of its curriculum a few years ago? Well, you can’t hack a sextant. In the seventh episode of the third season of "Things That Go Boom," our partner podcast from PRX, host Laicie Heeley looks at some of the vulnerabilities that come with an overreliance on high-tech defense systems.
Full story - August 18, 2020
Four white men in suits sit on a panel with a green background
This week, Critical State digs into new research about legislative oversight when it comes to security issues. As historian Peter Roady writes in a new article in the Journal of Policy History, the National Security Agency has escaped congressional oversight with two words: "It's classified."
Full story - August 11, 2020
A man raises his fist and wears a black BLM shirt as he stands in the sunroof of a car with a huge American flag.
Critical State takes a deep dive into new research by political scientist LaGina Gause, who developed a formal model to explain why legislative bodies are more responsive to some protests than to others.
Full episode - July 30, 2020
Things That Go Boom Season 3 logo with an illustration that includes a magnifying glass, a rocket, a coin, and the US Capitol building.
Disinformation and misinformation have been blurring the line between fantasy and reality since the start of communication itself. But over the last decade, they’ve posed an increasing threat to democracy in the United States, with the 2016 presidential election becoming a major flashpoint in Americans’ understanding of the consequences of fake news. In episode six of the third season of "Things That Go Boom," our partner podcast from PRX, host Laicie Heeley looks into how false information flooding the internet and spreading like wildfire on social media poses risks not just to national and election security, but to our health and safety.
Full story - July 28, 2020
A black and white photo of a Japanese family (woman, man, child) sitting in a kitchen setting.
Critical State, our weekly global security newsletter, takes a deep dive into new research on how the scars conflict leaves on regular civilians express themselves in post-conflict politics. In a new working paper, political scientists look into the long-term effects of Japanese internment camps in the US.

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