Full story - March 02, 2021
A man wearing jeans and sweater throws a rock near a fire burning outside
Critical State, our foreign policy newsletter, takes a deep dive into new research by political scientist Jana Krause on interactions between post-election violence and sexual violence in Kenya and Nigeria.
Full story - February 23, 2021
A dark volcano with smoke rising out of it surrounded by a body of water.
Critical State, our foreign policy newsletter, takes a deep dive into how local communities are handling COVID-19 in places like the Pacific island archipelago nation of Vanuatu.
Full story - February 16, 2021
People walk wearing face masks and shields over a bridge near a mall
Critical State, our weekly foreign policy fix, takes a deep dive into new research that looks at the challenges of public health communication in areas of civil conflict, with a focus on the Philippines.
Full story - February 09, 2021
An Indian farmer harvests vegetables from a field in Kanachak village, on the outskirts of Jammu, India, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021. 
Critical State, our foreign policy newsletter, takes a deep dive this week into how climate change affects food production and how conflicts over food arise.
Full episode - February 09, 2021
Things That Go Boom Season 3 logo with an illustration that includes a magnifying glass, a rocket, a coin, and the US Capitol building.
Darlene Turner is an Inupiaq Eskimo living on a battle line. Not the military kind, the climate change kind. With less sea ice to buffer storms, the ocean is washing away chunks of her village and its residents have made a difficult decision to relocate. “Would you relocate?” she asks. Experts believe stories like Turner’s are just a precursor to a massive migratory trend that could have millions of Americans on the move before mid-century. In this episode of "Things That Go Boom," The World's partner podcast from PRX, host Laicie Heeley examines how "climigration" could play out, and how climate change can become a threat multiplier.
Full story - February 02, 2021
Four people walk with their belongings outside. A woman wears a blue scarf on her hair. A barefoot man carries a bag on his shoulder.
Critical State, our weekly foreign policy newsletter, takes a deep dive into new research on how climate change endangers urban refugees in Chattogram, Bangladesh.
Full story - January 26, 2021
Adolf Hitler's Nazi campaign includes the indoctrination of children in Berlin, Feb. 24, 1936. The boys are trained for future military service and the girls to be obedient hausfraus. Here a group of boys proudly march beneath Nazi standards. 
This week, Critical State, our weekly foreign policy newsletter, looks at how the Germanization project of Hitler Youth played out in the borderlands of the Reich’s new holdings.
Full episode - January 26, 2021
Things That Go Boom Season 3 logo with an illustration that includes a magnifying glass, a rocket, a coin, and the US Capitol building.
Just after President Dwight D. Eisenhower assumed office on Jan. 20, 1953, deep in the middle of the Cold War, his greatest adversary died. The speech that followed is considered one of his best, though not his most well-known. Today, it’s not hard to imagine Eisenhower standing up before us and making the same case he did almost 70 years ago. In this episode of "Things That Go Boom," The World's partner podcast from PRX, host Laicie Heeley sits down with US Sen. Chris Murphy, someone in a position to offer a unique perspective on Eisenhower’s “Chance for Peace.”
Full story - January 12, 2021
Former rebel fighters parade during a ceremony at Nepalese Military Academy in Kharipati, Nepal, Aug. 26, 2013. 
Critical State, our weekly foreign policy newsletter, takes a deep dive into a new article by Margaux Pinaud, on how the Nepalese government explicitly turned to civil society organizations to monitor a ceasefire between the government and Maoist rebel forces.
Full story - January 05, 2021
Black and white painting of a civil war scene in Tennessee
This week in Critical State, our foreign policy newsletter, we look at new research on the complexities and costliness of post-conflict reconstruction.

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