Made in America: Trade policy in the Trump era

November 06, 2017

Made in America: Trade policy in the Trump era

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November 06, 2017

Trade and Manufacturing-2.jpg

In 2004 China flooded the market with cheap furniture, putting US companies out of business. This Galax, Va. company was saved from financial ruin when owner John Bassett III filed a petition against China and won $46 million in anti-dumping duties.

Credit:

Photo by Emily Johnson.

This hour, we'll talk about why trade was one of the biggest issues that got Donald Trump elected. What Americans stand to gain — and lose — by becoming more protectionist. And what really happened to American manufacturing jobs. We’ll also see how the rest of the world is preparing for a massive shift in US policy, from a microbrewery in Tijuana to a medical manufacturer in Berlin.

Featuring interviews with:

Edward Alden — senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations

I.M. (Mac) Destler — public policy professor at the University of Maryland 

Michael Froman — former US Trade Representative & fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations

Robert Howse — international law professor at NYU Law

Douglas Irwin — economics professor at Dartmouth College

Jyrki Katainen — vice president at the European Commission 

Scott Kennedy — director of the Project on Chinese Business at the Center for Strategic & International Studies

Jake Schmidt — director of the international program at the Natural Resources Defense Council

Derek Scissors — resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute

Monica Serrano — professor of International Relations at the College of Mexico

Featured stories: 

Maya Kroth profiles two businesses in Tijuana: one that could benefit if President Trump walks away from NAFTA and one that faces bankruptcy if NAFTA is cancelled. 

Emily Johnson reports from Galax, Virginia, where the furniture industry successfully fought against Chinese competition.

William Noah Glucroft reports from Berlin on how European businesses are dealing with American uncertainty on trade deals — and how some are looking to Canada and China as alternatives to the US. 

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