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Politics

Stuxnet virus threat is real

Iran discovered a malicious computer attack that appears to target its nuclear targets. But industry insiders believe the so-called computer worm Stuxnet actually did not do what it was intended for. The World technology correspondent Clark Boyd reports.

Politics

Yemen hosts Arabian Gulf soccer cup

The Gulf Cup of Nations soccer tournament is taking place in one of the most dangerous regions of one of the most dangerous nations on earth: southeast Yemen. Journalist Laura Kasinof has been writing about this improbable venue in Foreign Policy.

Politics

Europe largest brothel'

The Spanish economy is at a stand-still and unemployment remains at 20 percent. Brothels seem to be doing good business, especially a new one. It's called Paradise and it claims to be the largest in Europe. The World's Gerry Hadden reports.

Conflict & Justice

Auctioning off narco bling

Jewelry, helicopters and wines are all up for grabs in the Geo Quiz. The luxury goods are being auctioned off in the city that we want you to name. The auction features some of what Mexico's police force has seized from drug traffickers over the years.

Arts, Culture & Media

Mexico's Dance of the Devils

African music and culture live on in parts of Mexico, in communities where the descendants of African slaves live. But it's disappearing as older community members die. Myles Estey and Grant Fuller begin our story in the Costa Chica town of Lo de Soto.

Politics

NATO missile defense plans

NATO has a plan to build a new missile defense system in Europe and Turkey.But Turkey wants a say, and that could complicate matters.Anchor Marco Werman finds out more from the BBC's Jonathan Head in Istanbul.

Politics

Turkish immigrants leaving Germany

Third-generation immigrants, born and raised in Germany, are still considered foreigners. That's prompted many Turks to leave Germany for a country they've never lived in. Matthew Brunwasser reports from Istanbul.

Politics

Argentina tests stolen children

The stolen children of Argentina's 'disappeared' are now being forced to learn who they really are through DNA testing. Reporter Julia Kumari Drapkin profiles the case of one woman who initiated the DNA drive about 10 years ago.