Daily Edition Archive

Each edition has that day's stories listed with it.

International cooperation on the coronavirus in China

We speak with the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to find out about international cooperation with scientists in China on the coronavirus outbreak, America's preparedness for infections here and some experimental treatments being tested. South Sudan's political rivals President Salva Kiir and rebel leader Riek Machar have announced they will agree to share power and form a unity government by Saturday. Also, what inspired author Nazila Fathi to write two children books to help Iranian American kids feel proud of their heritage.

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German authorities treat shooting as act of terrorism

Federal prosecutors are treating the mass shooting in Hanau, Germany as an act of terrorism. Far-right extremism is thought to have motivated the shooter, who opened fire in two hookah bars in the western German town and killed at least nine people. We also look at the appointment of Ambassador Richard Grenell as acting director of national intelligence, and ask what impact it might have on US intelligence-gathering capabilities. Whitney Houston died in 2012, but some people are determined to keep some version of her alive. Next week in Sheffield, England, the pop-icon will appear to perform in concert.

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Syria's ongoing humanitarian crisis continues to worsen

The humanitarian crisis in northwestern Syria is massive. Since December, an estimated 900,000 civilians have fled from their homes as Syrian government forces — with Russian military help — have continued their offensive in Idlib province. Now, Turkey's president says it's "only a matter of time" before Turkish troops launch an operation of their own. And, as COVID-19 spreads, online platforms like Airbnb are telling users and hosts to take cautionary measures. Also, the British government is planning to implement a points-based immigration system in 2021 that aims to only attract high-skilled foreign workers.

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10,000: Grow your meal in a repurposed mattress

From The World and PRX, this is The Number in the News. Today’s number: 10,000. Zaatari, a Syrian refugee camp in Jordan, has quickly turned into a city of 80,000 people since opening in 2012. Water can be scarce and the desert soil is too poor to cultivate anything, making nutritious food a hard resource to come by. But scientists from the University of Sheffield in England have a solution. They're teaching refugees how to grow food by using old foam mattresses instead of soil. They have 10,000 mattresses on hand, and the UN Refugee Agency is training people how to use them. It’s working at the refugee camp, and it could be a solution used in cities around the world.

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A reality check on the coronavirus outbreak

We're due for another coronavirus reality check on what we know and how we know it. Dr. Michael Mina, an infectious disease specialist at Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health, speaks with The World's host Marco Werman about the latest understanding of how the virus spreads, how it incubates and how deadly COVID-19 is compared to other respiratory diseases. And, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos says he’ll start handing out $10 billion worth of grants to fight climate change. Also, in Thailand, snails have long been seen as creepy pests that ravage crops. Now a beauty craze sweeping Asia — rubbing collagen-rich snail excretion on your face — has radically hiked the value of snails.

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Life goes on despite coronavirus quarantines

The biggest cluster of coronavirus cases outside of China is on a cruise ship called the Diamond Princess. The World's host Marco Werman speaks with one of the passengers on board and with an infectious disease specialist at the University of Toronto. Also, meet a Chinese American family that's now on lockdown in northwest China. Plus, climate change may get some attention in Tuesday's Democratic presidential candidate debate in Nevada. Hear from one of the debate moderators who is also a climate journalist for Telemundo.

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How do you contain the coronavirus outbreak?

In China, health officials reported more than 5,000 new cases of the COVID-19 coronavirus and 121 deaths on Friday. Those numbers are just from the last 24 hours. So, how do you contain an outbreak like this? And, officials in Egypt on Friday announced the first case of coronavirus in the country. It’s also the first confirmed case in the whole of Africa. Also, the legend of Selena Quintanilla-Pérez is the focus of a new college course at San Diego State University.

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With new diagnosis methodology, COVID-19 cases grow

Officials in China's Hubei province are using a new methodology to diagnose people with COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. That new methodology increased the estimated number of infected people to nearly 60,000, the vast majority of them in China. And, more than 700,000 Syrians have tried to flee fighting in Syria's north-west province since December. But with a closed Turkish border and freezing temperatures, many remain trapped between Syrian and Turkish forces, with no hope in sight. Also, the Church of England has apologized for its racist actions against African Caribbean people who came to the United Kingdom after World War II.

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Penguins. They’re just like us

From The World and PRX, this is The Number in the News, Today’s number: 28. Researchers in Italy are listening more closely to penguins in an effort to understand how the flightless birds communicate. The study analyzed nearly 600 penguin “songs” from 28 adult African penguins and found that the structure of the songs closely imitates the structure of human language. Previous studies have found similarities between human language structure and the way chimpanzees communicate, but the new study from the University of Torino is the first to analyze birds. Listen to the penguin songs in this episode of The Number in the News, a daily flash briefing for your smart speaker that we’re featuring as a special here in The World’s podcast feed. Listen to The Number in the News every morning to hear a shareable story in just two minutes. It’s one number you won’t forget, plus why it’s in the news today. Click here to add The Number in the News to your smart speaker News Briefing on an Amazon or Google smart speaker. Produced by The World’s Bianca Hillier.

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Exposed encryption devices and what the CIA knew

For more than 50 years, the CIA used encryption devices to spy on its adversaries and allies. Just how much did the CIA know about the dirty deeds of military dictatorships in South America? And, Parents for Peace started out as a small support group for relatives of individuals who’ve joined extremist groups. Five years later, it has grown to include work on prevention. Plus, a Texas girl finds comfort in the Beatles after she moves to the US from Argentina and struggles to fit in.

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