Patrick Cox

Patrick Cox

Language Editor

At The World, I switch between editing and reporting, broadcasting and podcasting, in-depth series and tweeting.  Words connect what I do. On a good day they are intelligible.

Since 2008, I have been running The World's language desk and hosting a podcast called The World in Words. Before that, I reported on politics and culture, contributing to series on global obesity, the mental scars of Hiroshima and others.

London is my home town, Cambridge, MA, my adopted hometown. I have also lived in Alaska, California, Denmark and Moldova. 

Because of my job, I am sometimes mistakenly taken to be some kind of linguistic expert— by people who have not been exposed to my spelling or grammar. Despite that, I speak reasonable Danish, poor Chinese and atrocious French. I can read menus and follow soccer commentary in a few other languages.

Follow Patrick Cox on Twitter.

The World in Words podcast is on Facebook and iTunes

Recent Stories

Justice

Hiroshima survivors want more than a US apology

There’s something else that survivors of the A-bomb want: They want the world to agree to no more Hiroshimas. If the visit by John Kerry — and perhaps a future visit by Barack Obama — can help secure that, that would be more meaningful than a formal apology.

Science

Is bilingual better?

English speakers may not realize it, but the world is full of people who speak more than one language. A couple of recent studies show that we begin to develop our ear for language — or languages — long before we learn to speak.

Culture

Three mother tongues in one

Many Lebanese speak a full-on mix of Arabic, French and English. Calling this linguistic melange a "mother tongue" started out as a joke, but now it's become a part of Lebanon's national identity — even if it means that sometimes people don't understand what they are saying.

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