Jeb Sharp

Jeb Sharp

I joined the staff of The World in 1998 and have done almost every job in the newsroom since: reporter, producer, podcaster, backup host, show runner, special correspondent and now editor. Clearly I can't get enough of the place. I have reported for the show from Belgium, Bosnia, Canada, Chad, the Democratic Republic of Congo, France, Haiti, Gaza, Israel, Kosovo, the Netherlands, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania, the UK and across the US. I’ve received some nice honors along the way: a Nieman Fellowship at Harvard, two Overseas Press Club awards for “History of Iraq” and “How Wars End,” a Dart Award for “Rape as a Weapon of War, ” and a Sigma Delta Chi award from the Society of Professional Journalists for “Rwanda: Trying to Move On.” 

 

Recent Stories

Global Politics

Keeping out peacekeepers

The chaos in Chad has prevented European peacekeeping forces from deploying there and it's also raising more concerns about the long-delayed peacekeeping force for Darfur, as The World's Jeb Sharp has more.

The Taliban strategy

The luxury hotel in Kabul where Taliban attackers killed seven people yesterday is frequented by foreigners and diplomats, and The World's Jeb Sharp examines whether yesterday's raid represents a new strategy by the Taliban to target civilians, especially

Bush strategy on Iran

The World's Jeb Sharp reports on President Bush's remarks on Iran; the president recently accused Iran of threatening the security of nations everywhere, and on his current trip

Conflict & Justice

Part I: Healing the victims

The scope of tragedy in eastern Congo defies comprehension. A war in the African country killed four-million people between 1998 and 2003 and one of the most gruesome features of the conflicts is the widespread use of rape as a weapon. The World's Jeb Sharp reports from Bukavu, in Congo's South Kivu Province.

Conflict & Justice

Part III: Reintegrating Rwanda's killers

Rwanda faces a huge challenge nearly 13 years after the genocide. Huge numbers of people were killed but huge numbers of people have also been implicated in the killings. The Rwandan government wants justice for the victims but it also wants to promote reconciliation. So it's created a program of community service. It's designed to help confessed killers ease back into society.

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