Jason Strother

Jason Strother

Reporter Jason Strother is a freelance multimedia journalist who has reported from both sides of the Korean peninsula since moving to Seoul in 2006.

He makes frequent work trips around Asia and has also filed from Brazil. 

He got his start in the business as a producer at a 24-hour cable news channel in the Bronx, but always wanted the life of a foreign correspondent.  

He is also an adjunct professor of journalism at Montclair State University in his home state of New Jersey. 

Recent Stories

Global Politics

President Obama in South Korea

President Obama's Asia visit will conclude this week in South Korea. Many South Koreans are more worried about their government's decision to dispatch troops to Afghanistan. Jason Strothers previews the President's visit.

Lifestyle & Belief

South Korea's substitute men

Jason Strother tells us about a service for the stressed-out in South Korea. It's called �Substitute Men� and they'll do just about anything customers ask � within limits and the law.

Global Politics

Former South Korean leader dies

Former South Korean president Kim Dae Jung has died at the age of 85. Kim was responsible for opening up relations with North Korea after decades of hostility. Reporter Jason Strother looks back on his legacy.

Global Politics

North Korea releases South Korean

An executive from South Korean car maker Hyundai has won the release of a company employee held in North Korea. The employee had been accused insulting the North Korean regime. Reporter Jason Strother brings us the story.

Arts, Culture & Media

South Koreans back on beef wagon

South Koreans took to the streets a few months ago to protest lifting the ban on American beef. Not any more. Jason Strother reports from Seoul on how Koreans' sudden enthusiasm for American beef makes one wonder what all the fuss was about.

Environment

Internet addiction in South Korea

Many South Korean kids spend a lot of time on their computers, and some worry that many are addicted. Reporter Jason Strother tells us about a treatment program designed to get South Korea's children off the computer.

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