Bobby Bascomb

Bobby Bascomb

Bobby Bascomb is a freelance producer based in South Africa. Formerly she was a producer and reporter for the public radio program Living on Earth since 2006. With a background in environmental studies and geography, her reporting focuses on the often-complicated relationship between human development and environmental conservation. She has reported on critical environmental issues ranging from indigenous land rights to climate change.

Bobby has collaborated on a series of reports focused on deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon, including an hour-long documentary. That work explored a United Nations mechanism to mitigate climate change by reducing tropical deforestation. She also reported on the construction of a highly controversial dam installation on the Madeira River at the border between Brazil and Bolivia.

Recent Stories

Environment

Why lions can feast during a drought

This year's powerful El Niño has led to extreme drought in southern Africa, causing food prices to skyrocket and making life difficult for vulnerable people. But nature has its own purposes: Over time drought adjusts the balances among prey and predators.

Modern Gleaning Helps the Hungry

Gleaning is an ancient tradition. In the Torah and Old Testament farmers are instructed to leave some food in their fields for the poor to collect. Today volunteer gleaners can go to farmers fields at the end of the season to harvest the last of the bounty and then deliver the produce to food pantries for the food insecure.

The Green School

Bali, Indonesia is home for the school of dreams for antsy school children and environmentalists alike. The Green Schools buildings are made of local grass and bamboo, there are gardens scattered around campus to mimic a natural forest ecosystem and its on track to get 100 percent of its electricity from renewable sources. Living on Earths Bobby Bascomb takes us there.

Pesticides on Produce

An apple a day may keep the doctor away but most in American supermarkets also come spiked with a cocktail of residual chemical pesticides. We compared the choices of some shoppers to the Environmental Working Groups 2014 list of the fruits and vegetables with the most and least amount of detectible pesticide residues.

Pages