Antarctica

Want to find meteorites? Head to Antarctica.

Credit:

Nina Lanza

ng a sample from the Antarctic ice.

Plucking a sample from the Antarctic ice. The meteorites ANSMET finds may have fallen into the Antarctic snow thousands (if not millions) of years ago. The region’s katabatic winds scour away layers of ice, exposing these space rocks.

Credit:

Nina Lanza

ick to meteorite hunting? Telling the meteorites from the meteor-wrongs. The ANSMET team is looking for rocks with rounded edges and a shiny patina. Photo by Cindy Evans

The trick to meteorite hunting? Telling the meteorites from the meteor-wrongs. The ANSMET team is looking for rocks with rounded edges and a shiny patina.

Credit:

Cindy Evans

cting a meteorite with sterilized tongs. This one appears to be a carbonaceous chondrite. These meteorites contain high amounts of water and organic compounds and are thought to represent the composition of the solar nebula from which our solar system for

Collecting a meteorite with sterilized tongs. This one appears to be a carbonaceous chondrite. These meteorites contain high amounts of water and organic compounds and are thought to represent the composition of the solar nebula from which our solar system for

Credit:

Cindy Evans

me katabatic winds that make Antarctica such a fertile field for meteorite hunting also make camping…difficult. These winds are whipping at 60 mph.

The same katabatic winds that make Antarctica such a fertile field for meteorite hunting also make camping — difficult. These winds are whipping at 60 mph.

Credit:

Nina Lanza

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