Emerald ash borer tunnels scar an infested ash tree near the Merrimack River in New Hampshire. The invasive borers have killed millions of ash trees in North America over the last decade. Now researchers are releasing a small parasitic wasp in a last ditc

Emerald ash borer tunnels scar an infested ash tree near the Merrimack River in New Hampshire. The invasive insects have killed millions of ash trees in North America over the last decade. Now researchers are releasing a small parasitic wasp in a last ditch effort to save some of those that are left.

Credit:

Sara van Note

Scientists from the US Department of Agriculture study emerald ash borers at a quarantine lab on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

Scientists from the US Department of Agriculture study emerald ash borers at a quarantine lab on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

Credit:

Sara van Note

Researchers are using low-tech methods like this plastic cup nailed to an ash tree to release parasitic Oobius agrili wasps in New Hampshire and 17 other states. They're hoping the wasps, which are natural predators of emerald ash borers in their native C

Researchers are using low-tech methods like this plastic cup nailed to an ash tree to release parasitic Oobius agrili wasps in New Hampshire and 17 other states. They're hoping the wasps, which are natural predators of emerald ash borers in their native China, will help contain the borers here in North America.

Credit:

Sara van Note

Molly Heuss, New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands, peels the bark of an infested ash tree in Concord, NH

Molly Heuss, New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands, peels the bark of an infested ash tree in Concord, NH.

Credit:

Sara van Note
 

Emerald ash borers at work: dead ash trees are surrounded by maples in a New Hampshire forest.

Emerald ash borers at work: dead ash trees are surrounded by maples in a New Hampshire forest.

Credit:

Sara van Note

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