The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service's Forensic Lab in Ashland, Oregon includes a collection of reference samples of protected wildlife species. Lab staff say no animals were actually killed to build the collection.
The US Fish & Wildlife Service's Forensic Lab in Ashland, Oregon includes a collection of reference samples of protected wildlife species. Lab staff say no animals were actually killed to build the collection.
Credit:

Murray Carpenter

Lab director Ken Goddard holds one of 74 elephant tusks seized from traffickers smuggling ivory from Africa to China. The Forensics Lab tested dirt samples on the tusks to help narrow down their origin, as part of the investigation into who was responsibl
Lab director Ken Goddard holds one of 74 elephant tusks seized from traffickers smuggling ivory from Africa to China. The forensics lab tested dirt samples on the tusks to help narrow down their origin, as part of the investigation into who was responsible for the poaching.
Credit:

Murray Carpenter

The Ashland lab has thousands of animals for use as reference samples. This macaw is preserved in what's called a "forensics mount," with an outstretched wing to facilitate feather identification.
The Ashland lab has thousands of animals for use as reference samples. This macaw is preserved in what's called a "forensics mount," with an outstretched wing to facilitate feather identification.
Credit:

Murray Carpenter

Rhino horn used as a reference sample at the lab. This mass of keratin would likely fetch $150,000 on the black market.
This rhino horn is used as a reference sample at the lab. It could fetch $150,000 on the black market.
Credit:

Murray Carpenter

US Fish and Wildlife Service inspectors routinely find illegal consumer products made from protected species, some of which are on display at the forensics lab in Ashland.
US Fish and Wildlife Service inspectors routinely find illegal consumer products made from protected species, some of which are on display at the forensics lab in Ashland.
Credit:

Murray Carpenter

A rug made from the hide of a Burchell's zebra, found in a package at New York's JFK Airport. The patterns of the stripes near the tail helped inspectors determine that the skin was from a common Burchell’s zebra, rather than a protected species such as a
This rug made from the hide of a Burchell's zebra was found in a package at New York's JFK Airport. The patterns of the stripes near the tail helped inspectors determine that the skin was from a common Burchell’s zebra, rather than a protected species such as a Hartmann’s zebra. When there's a question or concern about a wildlife product found at US ports of entry, they are often sent to the Ashland lab for analysis.
Credit:

Murray Carpenter

The US Fish and Wildlife Service Forensics Lab, in Ashland, Oregon.
The US Fish and Wildlife Service Forensics Lab is in Ashland, Oregon.
Credit:

USFWS

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